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Pupil Personnel Services, School Counseling - Program Review Launchpad

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1. Program Summary

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1.1 Pupil Personnel Services, School Counseling Program Summary

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Program Summary

The School Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential program prepares school counselors to act as social justice advocates and agents of change in urban schools and diverse multicultural settings. We endorse the use of data-informed decision-making and evidence-based practices to effect systemic change in schools and the community.  As leaders of educational reform and the profession, our school counselors are trained to advocate for equity, achievement, and opportunity for all students. The American School Counselor Association’s (ASCA) National Model, which promotes a balanced, holistic approach that considers the academic, career, and social/emotional development of K-12 students, serves as a base for our program. 

Program Design

 

Our program's learning outcomes are aligned with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Program Standards and Performance Expectations. These Standards focus on the following areas:

  • Outcome 1: Plan, implement, and evaluate an urban school counseling program aligned with the ASCA National Model.
  • Outcome 2: Collaborate and consult with stakeholders such as parents and guardians, teachers, administrators and community leaders to create learning environments that promote educational equity and success for every student.
  • Outcome 3: Apply knowledge and skills of direct services at multiple tiers of support including individual and group counseling, academic advising, and instruction and classroom management, to meet the needs of a diverse urban student population.
  • Outcome 4: Demonstrate an awareness of how cultural values and biases impact the counselor-student relationship, and develop culturally responsive interventions that consider school, institutional, community, and environmental factors that enhance and impede student success.
  • Outcome 5: Understand and use research methods, program evaluation, and accountability strategies to demonstrate the effectiveness of the school counseling program, and to advocate for all students in order to close achievement, opportunity and attainment gaps.
  • Outcome 6: Identify and apply professional and personal qualities and skills of effective servant leaders through self-assessment related to school counseling skills and performance.

    Course of Study (Curriculum and Field Experience)

The program consists of a minimum of 60 units. A program planner will be provided to each student upon admission. Each Fall and Spring semester, students typically enroll in 5 courses. Summer enrollment is optional; there is limited availability of summer courses. School Counseling program courses are typically offered weeknights from 4:00-6:45PM or from 7:00-9:45PM, subject to change. Please note that the practicum and fieldwork experiences require that students be available to complete hours during the typical K-12 public school day (8AM-3PM). An asterisk (*) indicates new courses which will be offered beginning in 2022-23. 

 

Take all of the following (60-66 units): 

 

  • COUN 506 - Counseling in School Settings (3 units) 

  • COUN 507 - Career and Academic Counseling in K-12 Settings (3 units) 

  • COUN 510 - Law and Ethics for Counselors (3 units) 

  • COUN 513 - Introduction to Clinical Interviewing (3 units) 

  • COUN 515 - Counseling Theories (3 units) 

  • COUN 555 - Cross-Cultural Counseling (3 units) 

  • *COUN 602 - College Counseling for Equity and Access in K-12 Schools  

  • *COUN 604 - Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) for School Counselors (3 units) 

  • *COUN 605 Mental Health and Crisis Response in Schools (3 units) 

  • COUN 606 -School Counseling Curriculum and Instructional Design (3 units) 

  • COUN 607 -  School Counseling Practicum (3) 

  • COUN 638 - Group Counseling (3 units) 

  • COUN 643A - Counseling Field Work (School Counseling) (3 units) 

  • COUN 644A - Advanced Counseling Field Work (Advanced School Counseling) (3 units) 

  • COUN 695C - Integrative Seminar in Professional School Counseling (3 units) 

  • EDP 400 - Introduction to Educational Research (3 units) 

  • EDP 520 - Quantitative Research Methods in Education (3 units) 

  • EDP 536 - Collaborative Consultation in the Schools (3 units) 

  • EDP 596 - Program Evaluation in Education (3 units) 

  • EDP 604 - Seminar in Human Development (3 units) 

 

Culminating Experience (select one option):

 

  • Thesis Option - EDP 698 (6 units, completed over 2 semesters) 

or 

  • Comprehensive Examination (0 units, taken in last semester)

  •  

Completion of this program signifies that one has met the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) requirements for obtaining a Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential and qualifies the graduate to work as a school counselor in public and private school settings, K-12. The curriculum also covers all areas of the National Certified School Counselor examination.

 

Assessment of Candidates 

 

While completing program practicum requirements, typically year 1 second semester, candidates are assessed for program competencies by their university supervisor by the end of practicum. The practicum assessment consists of eight items and a five-point scale used to assess the extent to which candidates met expectations on program competencies. The assessment results are used during end of practicum assessment meetings between candidates and university supervisors to identify candidate strengths and areas in need of improvement. 

 

While completing program fieldwork requirements, typically in year 2 of the program, candidates are assessed once per semester during COUN 643A: School Counseling Field Work  and again in COUN 644A: Advanced School Counseling Field Work by both university and site supervisor. The fieldwork assessment consists of seven items and a five-point scale used to assess the extent to which candidates met expectations on program competencies. The assessment results are used during end of fieldwork assessment meetings between candidates, university, and site supervisors to identify candidate strengths and areas in need of improvement. If the fieldwork assessment indicates concerns related to the extent to which the candidate is meeting competencies, the university fieldwork coordinator is notified, and a plan of support is developed for the candidate. 

 

In addition to the site and university supervisor fieldwork assessment, candidates are assessed throughout fieldwork (COUN 643A and COUN 644A) for related school counselor performance expectations (SCPEs). This assessment is completed by the site supervisor and is also evaluated by the university supervisor to ensure fieldwork SCPEs have been met and completion of required fieldwork hours.  

 

Candidates are also assessed through a comprehensive examination that takes place at the end of the program and after Advancement to Candidacy. According to California Title 5 Requirements, the comprehensive examination is “an assessment of the student’s ability to integrate the knowledge of the area, show critical and independent thinking, and demonstrate mastery of the subject matter. The result of the examination evidence independent thinking, appropriate organization, critical analysis, and accuracy of documentation." Candidates receive guidance from program faculty about the dates and structure of the comprehensive examination.  

 

Candidates are advised about how they will be assessed in the program through practicum and fieldwork course syllabi and school counseling practicum/fieldwork handbook. Candidates are informed of results of assessment through site and university supervisor assessment meetings.  


1.1.1 Table Depicting Location, Delivery Models, and Pathways

Location

Delivery Model

Pathway

CSULB Main Campus

In-Person 

Traditional 

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2. Organizational Structure

3. Faculty Qualifications

Jump to 3.3, 3.4


3.1 Faculty Distribution Table

Full-Time

Part-Time

Vacancies

2

8

0


3.2 Annotated List of Faculty

Name & Degree Credential Courses Taught (Number & Title)

Rachel Andrews, M.A.

COUN 644A - Advanced School Counseling 

Amy Dauble-Madigan, M.A.Ed.

COUN 643A -School Counseling Field Work
COUN 644A - Advanced School Counseling Field Work

Enrique Espinoza, Ph.D.

COUN 644A - Advanced School Counseling Field Work

Laura Forrest, Ph.D.

COUN 638 - Group Counseling

Diane Hayashino, Ph.D.

COUN 555 - Cross Cultural Counseling

Steven Long, M.A., PPS

COUN 515 - Counseling Theory
COUN 607 - School Counseling Practicum

Claudia Lopez, M.S., LMFT, MPA

COUN 555 - Cross Cultural Counseling

Caroline Lopez-Perry, Ph.D.

COUN 510 - Laws and Ethics for Counselors
COUN 606 - Current Issues in Professional School Counseling
COUN 638 - Group Counseling
COUN 643A - School Counseling Field Work
COUN 644A - Advanced School Counseling Field Work
COUN 695C - Integrative Seminar in Professional School Counseling

Jacob Olsen, Ph.D.

COUN 506 - Counseling in School Settings
COUN 507 - Career and Academic Counseling in K12 Settings
COUN 510 - Laws and Ethics for Counselors
COUN 513 - Introduction to Clinical Interviewing
COUN 515 - Counseling Theory
ED P 596 - Program Evaluation in Education

Wendy Settles Crockett, M.S., PPS

COUN 607 - School Counseling Practicum

Cam-An Vo-Navarro, M.A.

COUN 507 - Career and Academic Counseling in K12 Settings
COUN 643A - School Counseling Field Work
COUN 644A - Advanced School Counseling Field Work


3.3 Published Adjunct Experience and Qualifications Requirements

Adjunct positions typically require an MA/MS degree, with a doctoral degree preferred, and relevant professional experience in this field. Specific adjunct qualifications currently are not published for this program. 


3.4 Faculty Recruitment Documents (PDF)

 

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4. Course Sequence

5. Course Matrix & Syllabi

6. Fieldwork & Clinical Practice

Jump to 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.6.1


6.1 Fieldwork and Clinical Practice Overview Table

Program

Total Hours

School Counseling

900

 

Course Number/Title Hours Fieldwork and Associated Assignment Requirements

COUN 607 School Counseling

Practicum

100

Assignment # 1: Mandated Reporter Exam

Assignment # 2: Case Conceptualization/Audio taping

Assignment # 3: Observation and Reflection

Assignment # 4: Career Appraisal & Advisement Case Presentation

Assignment #5: Counselor Essentials and Professional Protocols

COUN 643A School Counseling

Fieldwork

400

Assignment # 1: Individual Learning Goals

Assignment # 2: Case Study

Assignment # 3: Weekly Reflection Journal

Assignment # 4: Clinical Fieldwork Hours Log,

Competencies Log and Evaluation 

Assignment #5: Participation in Site and University Supervision

COUN 644A School Counseling

Fieldwork

400

Assignment # 1: Individual Learning Goals

Assignment # 2: Case Study

Assignment # 3: Weekly Reflection Journal

Assignment # 4: Clinical Fieldwork Hours Log, Competencies Log and Evaluation

Assignment #5: Participation in Site and University Supervision

Assignment #6: School Counselor E-Portfolio


6.2 Affiliation Agreements and MOUs for Field Placement


6.3 Veteran Practitioners Training Materials

PPS-SC Veteran Practitioner Training Information (PDF)


6.4 Documentation of Candidate Placement

PPS School Counseling Fieldwork Site Placements (PDF) 


6.5 Clinical Practice Manual

PPS-SC Fieldwork Handbook (PDF)


6.6 Fieldwork and Clinical Practice Syllabi

PPS School Counseling Clinical Practice Syllabi (PDF) 


6.6.1 Clinical Practice Assessment Instruments

PPS-SC Clinical Practice Assessment Instruments (PDF)

 

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7. Credential Recommendations

Jump to 7.1.1, 7.1.2

7.1 Description of Credential Recommendation Process

School Counseling candidates receive initial and ongoing advising through their program coordinator and advisors from the College of Education Graduate Office as they progress through the program.  Candidates can also monitor their program progress through the MyCSULB Student Center Academic Requirements Report.  In addition, each candidate admitted to the School Counseling Program will also establish a file in the CSULB Credential Center and submit all supporting documentation including verification of CTC fingerprint clearance, Basic Skills, and proof of a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution.  Candidates receive a credential evaluation (program status report), completed by a credential analyst, indicating their current program status and requirements that are outstanding and required prior to credential recommendation.   

 

At the end of the final semester the program coordinator will provide a program completion document to the Credential Center.  A credential analyst will complete a final evaluation and confirm that all program and state requirements have been met prior to credential recommendation, including the Master’s Degree in School Counseling.  A credential analyst will ensure that only qualified candidates are recommended for a Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential. 

 


7.1.1 Candidate Progress Monitoring Document
 

Pupil Personnel Services School Counseling Credential Evaluation (PDF)


7.1.2 Individual Development Plan (IDP) Form

 

Not applicable

 

 

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