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Education Specialist (ESN) Program - Program Review Launchpad

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1. Program Summary

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1.1 Education Specialist ESN Credential Program Summary

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Program Summary

The Preliminary Education Specialist Credential Program (ESCP) at CSULB prepares pre-services teachers to work with students with extensive support needs (ESN) in a variety of K-22 instructional settings.  Candidates seeking a preliminary ESN credential are offered a variety of pathway options:  Traditional post-bac ESN, Intern ESN, the Urban Dual Credential Program, and an additional or dual pathway option for Extensive Support Needs credential. The program is designed to combine a streamlined set of courses and early fieldwork to meet the Universal and Education Specialist TPEs. The Education Specialist Credential Program at CSULB has the following goals.  We aim to assist candidates in becoming: Effective & caring teachers; Partners with parents & others in the development of high-quality educational programs; Lifelong learners engaged in program development reflective of best practices in special education.

The program themes emphasize current issues of importance to the field of special education.  These themes are addressed across our curriculum and are as follows: Individualized Education; Collaboration; Cultural Responsiveness; Evidence-Based Practices; Advocacy & Leadership.  

The following five Program Learning Outcomes are developed throughout the arc of the program and are practiced and applied by candidates during Student Teaching: 1. Candidates will apply major special education laws, policies, frameworks of inclusion, MTSS, UDL, and CRSP to advocate for systems change. 2.  Candidates will use CRSP tenets to develop and implement an assessment system to create appropriate strength-based instructional goals and supports. 3. Candidates will use students’ IEP goals and the “plan, teach, assess, reflect, apply” cycle to provide effective instruction, implement interventions and monitor progress using HLP, EBP, inclusion, MTSS, UDL, and CRSP models. 4. Candidates will use the frameworks of CRSP, social-emotional learning and positive behavior support to develop and implement Tier 1, 2 and 3 supports.  5. Candidates will use CRSP tenets to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for collaborative relationships with families, school personnel, community partners and agencies to create quality strength- based educational plans. 

Leadership within the credential program. The Dean of the College of Education (CED) has oversight of all credential programs.  Responsibilities are shared amongst associate deans, department chairs, program coordinators, and supporting staff departments.  The EDSP program is part of the Advanced Studies in Education and Counseling (ASEC) department, and the EDSP program coordinator and the department chair have faculty appointments.  All program faculty in the ESCP program play a leadership role in aspects of the program to support each other and candidates.

Communication within the credential program and with the institution. Within the College of Education there is regular communication between the support departments of Teacher Preparation and Advising and the Credential Center with the Program Coordinator.  The Program Coordinator regularly meets with the CED Associate Dean and Department Chair, as well as representation from the other credential programs to discuss university and college policy issues and program development.  The Program Coordinator serves on committees that directly support and serve the program.  Communication to program faculty is then generated from the Program Coordinator.  The program focuses on providing consistent, ongoing, and timely communication to candidates.  

Structure of coursework and field experiences in the credential program. The program is structured to provide foundational content early in the program with some early fieldwork hours and then gradually more complex content is provided with accompanying fieldwork hours.  All fieldwork experiences are embedded in coursework with instructor oversight.  Candidates then complete a culminating fieldwork placement with accompanying coursework and seminar. The course of study is provided below and contains more details.

Program modifications over the recent two years. This program is a major redesign to meet the CTC adopted changes to the Education Specialist Credentials, including Education Specialist and Universal TPEs and the TPAs.  Reflected in our course of study are 8 new courses and a redesign of all remaining courses.

Means for stakeholder input. The ESCP program conducts and participates in advisory group meetings regularly to get input from our various stakeholders. Each semester the program participates in district partner meetings to strengthen the relationship with local districts and highlight evolving needs and changes. Cooperating teachers provide critical feedback on their experiences working with candidates and on program practices and fieldwork materials.  Candidates complete an exit survey at the completion of their program and this information is used each semester to guide program improvement.

Course of Study (Curriculum and Field Experience)

Description of the sequence of coursework. Candidates complete 6 units of Pre-Requisites that cover content focused on equitable education that supports students with disabilities.  Courses include: EDSP 454 - Academic Language Development and Inclusive Instruction for English Language Learners (3 units/25 hours fieldwork) and EDSP 410 – Inclusive and Equitable practices in Special Education (3 units/25 hours fieldwork). 

Upon admission to the credential program candidates will complete 8 courses (24 units) with a focus on culturally responsive and sustaining practices that support equitable and inclusive placements for students with disabilities.  These courses include: EDEL 452 – Teaching and Learning Reading, K-8 (3 units/10 hours fieldwork); UDCP 400 – Foundations of Teaching and Learning in Diverse Inclusive Settings (2 units/10 hours fieldwork); EDSP 534 - Collaboration and Transition in Special Education (3 units/10 hours fieldwork); EDSP 564 - Assessment and Evaluation of Students with Disabilities (3 units); EDSP 558 – Literacy Supports for Students with Diverse Abilities (4 units/130 hours fieldwork); EDSP 518 – Integrated Math Instruction Across Content Areas (3 units); UDCP 401 – Positive Behavior Supports (3 units/15 hours fieldwork)

EDSP 578 - Instructional Methods and Strategies for Individuals with Extensive Support Needs (3 units/10 hours fieldwork).

The final fieldwork semester consists of a student teaching, EDSP 588 Student Teaching for Extensive Support Needs (8 units/450 hours fieldwork) and a seminar to support development of the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) EDSP 589 – Student Teaching Seminar: Education Specialist (1 unit).

Candidates opting for the intern pathway will take EDSP 586 (1 unit) each semester they are in the program before final fieldwork in addition to these courses.

Coordination of coursework with field work. Candidates complete 225 hours of early fieldwork all embedded within courses and coursework assignments (see pre-requisite and core courses listings above). Student teaching provides the other 450 hours of final fieldwork.

Types of coursework in critical areas. The program offers coursework in several critical areas for Education Specialist Candidates. Each of these areas is covered throughout the program in all courses. Here we highlight those courses that focus on these areas. In five of our courses (EDSP 454, EDSP 518, EDSP 534, EDSP 578, EDSP 589) we focus on developmentally appropriate practices. Meeting the needs of English learners is specifically attended to in EDSP 454, EDSP 588, and EDSP 589.  Literacy is a focus in (EDEL 452, EDSP 558, EDSP 578, EDSP 589, EDSP 588). These are also critical areas in our program: Individualized Education (all), Collaboration (EDSP 534), Cultural Responsiveness (all), Evidence-Based Practices  (EDSP 558, EDSP 578), and Advocacy & Leadership   (UDCP 400, EDSP 534, EDSP 578)

Number and type of field placements. Students will have multiple field placements over the course of the program, that cover a spectrum of ages, settings, content, and exceptionalities.  All clinical fieldwork hours are submitted through the platform S4 @ The Beach and a completed Fieldwork Log, generated by S4 @ The Beach, is required during student teaching showing the depth and breadth of experiences by candidates across the arc of the program.  The Office of Clinical Practices places student teachers with collaborative partnership with school districts.

Connection of field experience with coursework. The content of courses directly connects to each fieldwork experience housed within each course.  Instructors make all content relevant to practice, bridging the research to practice gap. This includes the courses that do not require fieldwork as the instructors link the content to experiences gained from other courses.  Additionally, many of our full-time faculty also supervise student teachers and bring current connections and examples of best practices as seen in the field.   Courses taught by part-time faculty have the benefit of the practicing practitioner’s lens, linking coursework to current field practices.   

Field supervision, advisement, evaluation: Student teacher candidates are advised of the final fieldwork process and requirements starting at their initial mandatory advisement meeting and throughout their program by utilizing the Education Specialist Website and program updates shared through digital platforms.  Student teachers are assigned a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher, whether following a traditional or intern pathway.  University supervisors meet and observe the student teacher for a minimum of 10 visits across the semester.  Cooperating teachers provide daily support for traditional student teachers or a minimum of 5 hours a week of direct support and supervision if interns.  The student teacher receives written and verbal feedback on meeting competencies from the cooperating teacher and university supervisors through the Direct Observation Form, weekly journals that are exchanged between the triad, and formative and summative evaluations.  

Assessment of Candidates

How, when candidates are assessed for program competencies. Program competencies are assessed throughout the program in every course (Course Matrix). EDSP coursework and fieldwork are assessed by candidates’ completion of course-specific TPEs.  Professional preparation coursework and field experiences are evaluated by multiple assessment strategies, including exams, course projects, and written reflections. In final fieldwork, candidates are assessed using both Midpoint (formative) and Final (summative) Evaluations as well as a Direct Observation Form to provide feedback on program competencies.   Candidates take a seminar course designed to provide them practice opportunities on TPA activities.  

What advice candidates receive about how they will be assessed in the program and informed of the results of those assessments. Upon program admission, candidates participate in Mandatory Advisement which provides an overview of the program, assessments, and expectations. Each course has developed signature assignments which measure course learning outcomes, directly tied to TPEs. At the start of the student teaching semester, candidates attend a Mandatory Orientation which provides an overview of the student teaching semester’s requirements and assessments.  Student teaching candidates receive weekly feedback during their student teaching semester to inform their progress towards meeting the TPEs. Candidates complete both cycles of the CalTPA during their student teaching semester and are supported through a seminar course that guides them in understanding and completing the TPA.  Students who do not pass a cycle of the CalTPA are offered one-on-one coaching services from a university TPA coach. Candidates who do not meet program expectations or expected dispositions are placed on a Support and Intervention Plan that is monitored by the Program Coordinator in addition to core faculty and the university supervisor. 

 


1.1.1 Table Depicting Location, Delivery Models, and Pathways

Location Delivery Model Pathway
Main Campus  In-Person  Extensive Support Needs Traditional Student Teaching 
Main Campus  In-Person  Extensive Support Needs Internship  

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2. Organizational Structure

3. Faculty Qualifications

Jump to 3.3, 3.4

3.1 Faculty Distribution Table

Full-Time Part-Time Vacancies
13 23 0

3.2 Annotated List of Faculty

Name & Degree

Credential Courses Taught (Number & Title)

Edwin Achola, Ph.D.

EDSP 534 - Collaboration and Transition in Special Education

Cedric Anderson, Ph.D.

EDSP 587A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar

EDSP 588A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar

Melvin Cobb, M.S.

ETEC 110 - Technology for Educators

Jennifer Coots, Ph.D.

ED P 301 - Child Development

Lori Curci-Reed, Ed.D.

EDEL 452 - Teaching and Learning Reading

Cathlee Geraghty Jenkinson, Ph.D.

ED P 405 - Positive Strategies for Classroom Management 

Noah Golden, Ph.D.

EDSE 457 - Reading and Writing in the Secondary School 

Stacy Griffin, Ed.D.

EDEL 452 - Teaching and Learning Reading

Kim Hall, M.A.T.

EDSE 457 - Reading and Writing in the Secondary School 

Deborah Hamm, Ed.D.

EDEL 452 - Teaching and Learning Reading

Nat Hansuvadha, Ph.D.

EDSP 587A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar

Leann Hardwick, Ed.D.

ED P 560 - Behavior Analysis and Intervention

Shawne Hume, M.A.

EDSE 457 - Reading and Writing in the Secondary School 

Stephanie Hunt, M.S.

EDSP 564 - Assessment and Evaluation of Students with Disabilities

EDSP 587A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar

Linda Keil, M.S.

EDSP 454 - Academic Language Development of English Language Learners 

Susan Leonard-Giesen, Ed.D.

EDSP 454 - Academic Language Development of English Language Learners

EDSP 480 - Foundations of Inclusive Education in a Diverse Society

EDSP 578 - Instructional Methods and Strategies for Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities

EDSP 587A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar 

EDSP 588A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar

Heather Macias, Ph.D.

EDSE 457 - Reading and Writing in the Secondary School 

Kimberly Martin, M.S.

EDSP 350 - Introduction to Teaching the Exceptional Individual 

Wendy  McWhorter, M.A.

EDEL 452 - Teaching and Learning Reading

Robyn Moses, M.S.

ED P 302 - Early and Late Adolescent Development and Learning: A Cross Cultural Perspective

Mardell Nash, M.S.

EDSP 586 - Intern Support

EDSP 587A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar 

EDSP 588A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar 

Jennifer Prager, Ed.D.

EDSP 350 - Introduction to Teaching the Exceptional Individual 

Melvina Raschke, M.A.

EDEL 452 - Teaching and Learning Reading

Jolan Smith, Ph.D.

ED P 405 - Positive Strategies for Classroom Management

EDSP 564 - Assessment and Evaluation of Students with Disabilities

Ashley Stewart, Psy.D.

ED P 301 - Child Development

Kristin Stout, M.S.

EDSP 577 -  Instructional Methods and Strategies forIndividuals with Mild/Moderate Disabilities

EDSP 587A/B - Advanced Field Study and Seminar 

Rita Suh, Ed.D.

ED P 301 - Child Development

Dana Tate, Ed.D.

EDSE 457 - Reading and Writing in the Secondary School 

Sylvie Taylor, Ph.D.

ED P 302 - Early and Late Adolescent Development and Learning: A Cross Cultural Perspective

Joanne Tortorici Luna, Ph.D.

EDP 301 - Child Development

EDP 302 - Adolescent Development

Shelley Xu, Ed.D.

EDEL 452 - Teaching and Learning Reading


3.3 Published Adjunct Experience and Qualifications Requirements

Faculty Qualifications Requirements (PDF) 


3.4 Faculty Recruitment Documents

This program has not recruited full-time faculty in recent years.

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4. Course Sequence

5. Course Matrix & Syllabi

6. Fieldwork & Clinical Practice

Jump to 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.6.1

6.1 Fieldwork and Clinical Practice Overview Table

ESCP ESN Fieldwork Hours Table (PDF)


6.2 Affiliation Agreements and MOUs for Field Placement

CED Approved Fieldwork Districts and Community Partners

CED Affiliation Agreement Template (PDF)

Signed Affiliation Agreements

CED Intern MOU Template (PDF)

Signed MOUs


6.3 Veteran Practitioners Training Materials

Requirements of Cooperating Teachers (PDF)

Supervisor Meeting Agenda (PDF)

Veteran Practitioner Training (PDF)


6.4 Documentation of Candidate Placement

MS Candidate Placements - Traditional (PDF)

MS Candidate Placements - Intern (PDF)


6.5 Clinical Practice Manual

ESN Student Teaching Handbook (PDF)


6.6 Fieldwork and Clinical Practice Syllabi

EDSP 588 ESN Syllabus (PDF)

EDSP 588A ESN Syllabus (PDF)

EDSP 586 Intern Syllabus (PDF)

EDSP 589 Seminar Syllabus (PDF)


6.6.1 Clinical Practice Assessment Instruments

Clinical Practice Assessment Instruments (PDF)

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7. Credential Recommendations

Jump to 7.1 (Intern Pathway), 7.1.1, 7.1.2

7.1 Description of Credential Recommendation Process - Traditional Pathway

Description of process ensuring appropriate recommendation, including IDP process: 

 

Candidates in the Education Specialist Credential Program receive initial and ongoing advising from the program coordinator and advisors in the Teacher Preparation Advising Center.  Candidates can monitor their own program progress through the MyCSULB Student Center Academic Requirements Report and receive a personalized Advisement Plan that is created once accepted to the program.  Each candidate will also establish a file in the CSULB Credential Center and submit all supporting documentation including their Advisement Plan, CTC fingerprint clearance, Basic Skills, and Subject Matter Verification.  Candidates receive a credential program evaluation, completed by a credential analyst, indicating their current program status and requirements that are outstanding and required prior to credential recommendation. 

 

Education Specialist IDP process: During Student Teaching all candidates complete an Individual Development Plan (IDP) in collaboration with their University Supervisor and Cooperating Teaching.  Goals for each plan are developed utilizing the summative assessment information obtained through Student Teaching. The IDP is designed to be a foundational tool for candidates entering into Induction programs.  Candidates retain a copy of their IDP, and a copy of this document is uploaded into the data-based system, S4@The Beach, along with all other fieldwork documents.   

 

At the completion of their final semester, once grades for all courses have been posted, the program coordinator provides a clearance form to the Credential Center indicating that the candidate has completed all program requirements, including passing of the TPA and RICA.  A credential analyst will complete a final evaluation and confirm that all program and state requirements have been met prior to credential recommendation.  A credential analyst ensures that only qualified candidates are recommended for their Preliminary Education Specialist Credential.  


7.1 Description of Credential Recommendation Process - Intern Pathway

Description of process ensuring appropriate recommendation, including IDP process: 

 

Candidates in the Education Specialist Credential Program receive initial and ongoing advising from the program coordinator and advisors in the Teacher Preparation Advising Center.  Candidates can monitor their own program progress through the MyCSULB Student Center Academic Requirements Report and receive a personalized Advisement Plan that is created once accepted to the Intern pathway.  Support in meeting intern requirements, including support for the Intern Development Plan, is provided through enrollment in the Intern Support Course (EDSP 586).  Each candidate will also establish a file in the CSULB Credential Center and submit all supporting documentation including their Advisement Plan, CTC fingerprint clearance, Basic Skills, and Subject Matter Verification.  Candidates receive a credential program evaluation, completed by a credential analyst, indicating their current program status and requirements that are outstanding and required prior to credential recommendation. Once employed and within 30 days of their hire date, Interns create an Intern Development Plan with their Principal. 

 

Education Specialist IDP process: During Student Teaching all candidates complete an Individual Development Plan (IDP) in collaboration with their University Supervisor and Cooperating Teaching.  Goals for each plan are developed utilizing the summative assessment information obtained through Student Teaching. The IDP is designed to be a foundational tool for candidates entering into Induction programs.  Candidates retain a copy of their IDP, and a copy of this document is uploaded into the data-based system, S4@The Beach, along with all other fieldwork documents.   

 

At the completion of their final semester, once grades for all courses have been posted, the program coordinator provides a clearance form to the Credential Center indicating that the candidate has completed all program requirements, including passing of the TPA and RICA.  A credential analyst will complete a final evaluation and confirm that all program and state requirements have been met prior to credential recommendation.  A credential analyst ensures that only qualified candidates are recommended for their Preliminary Education Specialist Credential.  


7.1.1 Candidate Progress Monitoring Documents

Traditional Pathway

ESCP Advisement Plan 2022 - Traditional (PDF)

ESCP Extensive Support Needs Credential Evaluation - Traditional (PDF)

Intern Pathway

ESCP Advisement Plan 2022 - Intern (PDF)

ESCP Extensive Support Needs Intern Evaluation - Intern (PDF)

Intern Professional Development Plan - Intern (PDF)


7.1.2 Education Specialist ESN Individual Development Plan (IDP)

Individual Development Plan (IDP) Form - Intern & Traditional (PDF)

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