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Be a Student-Ready University

As teaching and technology modalities evolve and our population of non-traditional learners increases, we must ensure that our campus is ready for students. We must welcome and engage new students the moment they are accepted to the university and foster a community of belonging through coordinated mentorship, campus connection, and student organization opportunities. We must connect learning to the future of work through agile curricula, flexible degree paths, technology readiness, and high-impact practices for the modern workforce. As student success and overall well-being are intertwined, we must coordinate our robust mental, physical, and emotional health resource infrastructure to serve all students wherever there is need.

A Student-Ready University is one that explores curricular offerings that foster lifelong learning, interdisciplinary curriculum, and alternative modes of delivery.

Foster a community of belonging for all students.

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS

1a. Create a formalized Summer pathway (Semester Zero) from admission to year 2, to include new student Convocation, freshmen seminar, peer mentorship, wellness, selfcare, citizenship, and leadership components.

 

1b. Establish an institutional structure focused on Student Readiness.

 

1c. Perform a communications audit to evaluate strategic messaging opportunities and consolidate student communications.

 

1d. Create a formalized platform for student mentorship by faculty, peers and staff.

INFRASTRUCTURE AVAILABLE
  • Division of Student Affairs
  • Division of Academic Affairs
  • Associated Students, Inc.
  • Student Cultural Resource Centers
  • Residential Life Offices
  • Beach Nexus mentoring platform
OPPORTUNITIES

Our student-serving divisions have many introductory and supplemental resources already in effect; assessing and coordinating their efforts will create a more focused, efficient, and personalized support system for students transitioning to college and professional life, and will create opportunities to deepen student data to inform services.

CHALLENGES

Anticipating budget challenges in the early 2020s, keen resource management, realigning of existing programs, and leveraging data will be critical to developing cost-effective engagement activities.

RESILIENCE

A healthy and engaged campus community is a key component of a healthy campus climate. The satisfaction and success of constituents helps ensure enrollment and retention numbers remain strong even in times of social challenges and economic uncertainty.

Prioritize student health and well-being.

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS

2a. Assess and coordinate existing mental health and wellbeing offerings. 
 
2b. Expand Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) and other mental health services. 
 
2c. Create a parent/support-person training platform (i.e., How can I help my student child/partner?

INFRASTRUCTURE AVAILABLE
  • Division of Student Affairs
  • Student Recreation & Wellness Center
  • Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
  • Academic Departments
  • Club sports
  • Athletics
  • Alumni outreach
OPPORTUNITIES

Providing robust and comprehensive wellbeing resources enhances all aspects of students’ academic and personal lives. With dozens of resources currently available on campus, an audit and strategic consolidation of efforts can ensure these resources reach the students who need them.

CHALLENGES

Surveys show that, while student awareness of wellbeing resources is high, participation is often low, and students can be overwhelmed with uncoordinated communications efforts. Coordinating offerings and communication regarding sensitive subjects can help drive engagement and participation.

RESILIENCE

Health and wellbeing must be a priority in the COVID-19 era and beyond. Providing students with continuous resources and strategic communications will help reduce anxiety and improve all other outcomes.

Connect learning to the future of work.

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS

3a. Create alternate credentialing pathways (alternative and interdisciplinary degrees, certifications, stackable modules, meta majors).
 
3b. Guarantee high-impact practices for every student (internships, study abroad, service-learning, research, proactive advising).
 
3c. Match campus level of technology with needs of incoming students.
 
     • Provide technology and training that is on par with what is used in high schools, junior colleges and the modern workforce.
 
3d. Provide access to necessary technology to all students

INFRASTRUCTURE AVAILABLE
  • Division of Academic Affairs
  • Division of Information Technology
  • Academic Technology Services
  • Center for Community Engagement
  • Career Development Center
  • Dean of Student Success
OPPORTUNITIES

Providing a wide variety of academic models and pathways, credentials, and high-impact practices will attract a greater diversity of traditional and non-traditional students, create opportunities to supplement the budget, strengthen our ties to industry, and give students the tools to succeed in an ever-evolving modern workforce.

CHALLENGES

New high-impact practices may face resistance within the institution if they appear to contradict conventional practices. Similarly, new academic models may appear to prioritize workforce-readiness over scholarly pursuits. Training faculty and staff to implement high-impact practices and new academic models will require concentrated effort. New offerings will likely require supplemental revenue models.

RESILIENCE

“Conventional” wisdom suggests that enrollment in advanced degrees declines in a good economy, but the coming decade promises uncertainty in terms of economy, workforce, and public health. Having relevant advanced and stackable forms of learning such as micro-credentials will attract new audiences and offer students flexibility in an uncertain environment.