VOL. LIV, NO. 119
California State University, Long Beach May 17, 2004
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Civil rights group condemns work of CSULB professor

Kevin MacDonald
Kevin MacDonald

By Karl Peterson
On-line Forty-Niner

The Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights group based in Montgomery, Ala., recently condemned the work of a Cal State Long Beach professor and the Web site on which he publishes as being anti-Semitic and anti-immigration.

Kevin MacDonald, a professor in the psychology department since 1985, has published three books and many articles in his career. MacDonald concludes that Jews have for centuries had a strategy to keep their gene pool separate from other races and religions. He also studies the Jewish political influence, writing that Jews are heavily involved in the Bush administration’s pro-Israel foreign policy.

“He put the anti-Semitism under the guise of scholarly work,” said Mark Potok, the editor of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s quarterly magazine, Intelligence Report. “Kevin MacDonald’s work is nothing but gussied up anti-Semitism. At base it says that Jews are out to get us through their agenda.”

The Southern Poverty Law Center is a civil rights group that started in 1971 and became renowned in the early ’80s for its work studying and subsequently suing the Ku Klux Klan.

Arlene Lazarowitz, the director of the Jewish studies program at CSULB, said that while she does not agree with many of MacDonald’s conclusions and that they are too subjective, she is happy that CSULB allows its faculty to think and publish freely without the threat of censorship.

In a debate about the validity of MacDonald’s research by members of the College of Liberal Arts it was determined that the tenured professor did not teach any of his research in the classroom and therefore was entitled to publish his research.

Lazarowitz added that instead of censorship, the best response to MacDonald’s research is to prove it wrong.

MacDonald said that his work is purely intended to describe breeding trends in the Jewish community, which is very influential the world over. The 60-year-old professor, who teaches child and adolescent development and social personality development, said the Southern Poverty Law Center was too quick to jump to conclusions about his work.

“The Jews are a very influential group,” MacDonald said. “All I’m trying to do is describe their breeding patterns.”

MacDonald said that people are too concerned about being politically correct and that one cannot write anything about the Jewish community or about cutting off immigration into the United States without being labeled an anti-Semite or anti-immigration.

Joyce Greenspan, the regional director of the Orange County/Long Beach office of the Anti-Defamation League, said that MacDonald’s trilogy of books is about the Jewish people planning to take over the world. She added that whether MacDonald is an anti-Semite is not a yes or no answer but “that some of his concepts are very questionable.”

Greenspan said the ADL has been aware of MacDonald for some time and despite whether or not their civil rights group believes his work is anti-Semitic, he is entitled to say whatever he wants under the First Amendment, which the ADL also works to protect. She said that the ADL would only be concerned if there were a violent call to action.

The Web site, www.vdare.com, that Potok said is “primarily white supremacist,” on which MacDonald published an article entitled “Thinking about Neoconservatism,” was also condemned by the Southern Poverty Law Center and is linked on MacDonald’s home page to the CSULB Web site. V Dare also features articles written by controversial figures like Jared Taylor, the editor of the white supremacist magazine American Renaissance and Sam Francis, the editor of a white supremacist newspaper, whose Web site describes blacks as “a retrograde species of humanity.”

“His work is bandied about by just about every neo-Nazi group in America,” Potok said of MacDonald, who received a bachelor’s degree from University of Wisconsin, Madison and a Ph.D. from University of Connecticut.

“It is like nuclear energy, you can use it for good or you can use it for evil,” MacDonald said of the white supremacist’s interest in his articles and books.

MacDonald also received attention for his role in the 1996 to 2000 libel trial of David Irving. Irving sued Deborah Lipstadt for libel after her book review caused Penguin books to stop publication of Irving’s book. Irving lost his case when the judge agreed with the statements in the book review, that said his book both sympathized with Nazis and that his misrepresantation of evidence amounted to a denial of the holocaust.

MacDonald was the only witness in the trial to appear on behalf of Irving. In his testimony, MacDonald said that he felt Irving was being unfairly targeted by the defendant and other Jewish groups.

MacDonald said he has no personal relationship with Irving and that he was involved in the trial because of the free speech issues involved with the trial.

Just as MacDonald hoped to protect the free speech rights of Irving he has been granted the same privilege by CSULB.

 


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