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Materials:

Student directions, with links to background essay, primary and secondary sources

Note for teachers on primary and secondary sources

Background essays:
1. Student essay online 
(and as a downloadable PDF)

2. Teacher version

Student questions for "Women and Education"

As you read through the materials for this project, keep in mind these central questions:

1.What role did Elizabeth Murray play in the education of her nieces?
Some questions to consider as implications of the broad question:
a.Why was education so important to Murray?
b.What kind of education did she provide for her nieces?
c.What resources enabled Murray to provide this education?

2.What does this activity reveal about opportunities for female education and the nature of female education in the colonial period?

I. Introduction (Student Essay) 
Read through this essay. It will provide you with important background information about education in the colonial period, especially the opportunities available for females. The essay will assist you in thinking about the first questions above.

II. Document list:

Secondary sources
Document 1: Linda Kerber, Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1980), 190.
Document 2: Linda Kerber, Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1980), 192-193. 
Document 3: Patricia Cleary, Elizabeth Murray: A Woman's Pursuit of Independence in Eighteenth-Century America (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2000), 72.
Document 4: Linda Kerber, Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1980), 198.
Document 5: Mary Beth Norton, Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996), 259.
Document 6: Kenneth Lockridge, Literacy in Colonial New England: An Enquiry into the Social Context of Literacy in the Early Modern West (New York: Norton, 1974), 39.

Primary sources
Document 7: The Old Deluder Act (1647) From Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England (1853), II: 203.
Document 8: Papers of Jeremy Belknap, III, Collections of the MHS, LIV (Boston, 1891) as cited in Mary Beth Norton, Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996), 260.
Document 9: Elizabeth Murray, Boston Evening-Post, March 1753, "Shop Advertisement and Embroidery Lesson."
Document 10: Elizabeth [Murray] Smith to James Murray, 26 February 1770.
Document 11: Elizabeth [Murray] Smith to Mrs. Deblois, 13 April 1770.
Document 13: Benjamin Rush," Thoughts upon Female Education," 1787.