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Student directions for "The Consumer Revolution, America, and Britain"

As you read through the materials for this project, keep in mind this central question:

I. Introduction (Student Essay) 
Read through this essay. It will provide you with important background information about consumer spending in the decades preceding the American Revolution and how this spending affected the colonies' relationship with Britain.

II. Secondary and Primary Sources Document list:

Secondary sources
Document 1: Table 13.1 "Exports From Great Britain to the Continental Colonies"
Document 2: Table 13.2 "Selected English Exports Sent to British America, 1770" 
Document 3: British culture, T. H. Breen, Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence , (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 167-168.
Document 4: American demand for British goods, T. H. Breen, Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence , (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 61.
Document 5: Debt after the French and Indian War, T. H. Breen, Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence , (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 206.

Primary sources
Document 6: Elizabeth Murray, "Trade Bill," [ca 1750].
Document 7: Henrietta Maria East Caine, Boston Evening-Post, 11 June 1750, "Shop advertisement."
Document 8: An evil and adulterous generation. A sermon preached on the publick fast, April 19. 1753. By Andrew Eliot, M.A. Pastor of a church in Boston (Boston: Printed by S. Kneeland, for J. Winter, over against the King's Arms in Union-Street., 1753), p. 21.
Document 9: Benjamin Franklin, Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries 1751. Labaree, Leonard W., et al., eds. The Papers of Benjamin Franklin. 35 vols. to date. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1959-1999), 4:225-234.
Document 10: Four dissertations, on the reciprocal advantages of a perpetual union between Great-Britain and her American colonies. Written for Mr. Sargent's prize-medal. To which (by desire) is prefixed, an eulogium, spoken on the delivery of the medal at the public commencement in the College of Philadelphia, May 20th, 1766. (Philadelphia: Printed by William and Thomas Bradford, at the London Coffee-House, 1766), p. 55.
Document 11: Thomas Fitch, Four dissertations, on the reciprocal advantages of a perpetual union between Reasons why the British colonies, in America, should not be charged with internal taxes, by authority of Parliament; humbly offered, for consideration, in behalf of the colony of Connecticut. 1764.