Edmund Ming Yip Kwong
Project S'More:
Small is More, 2013
© Edmund Ming Yip Kwong

 

 

Project S'More:
Small is More, 2013 (detail)
© Edmund Ming Yip Kwong

 

 

 

CURRENT EXHIBITION

The University Art Museum partners with the artist-led experimental architecture and design organization Materials & Applications (M&A) to present Materials & Applications: Building Something (Beyond) Beautiful, Projects 2002 – 2013.

January 25 - April 13, 2014

This exhibition—a capstone to more than ten years of effort on the part of the Los Angeles-based nonprofit to advance new and underused ideas in art, architecture, and landscape—will feature images and artifacts from projects by:

Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues; Gail Peter Borden; Jenna Didier with Ian Quezada and Daniel Ash; FoxLin (Michael Fox and Juintow Lin), NONDesigns (Scott Franklin and Miao Miao) and Brand Name Label (Gabriel Renz), Axel Kilian, and Darius Miller; Anja Franke, John Southern, and Nick Blake; Edmund Ming Yip Kwong; Jimenez Lai; Layer (Lisa Little and Emily White); Rob Ley; Oyler Wu Collaborative (Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu); François Perrin; Marcelo Spina; Doris Sung, with Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter and Matthew Melnyk; Eddy Sykes; and Workshop LEVITAS and Infranatural.

M&A related activities began this fall when local community members joined Oliver Hess, Director Emeritus of M&A, and students from CSULB Assistant Professor Heather Barker's Design course 360A Environmental Communication Design in a three-part "crowd-sourcing" workshop coordinated with Arts Council for Long Beach dedicated to developing a design for the project. The resulting efforts of the class will culminate in a documentary installation in the Wesley G. Hampton Gallery at the UAM. The site-specific installation called MatterApp:Pyramidial (MA:P) will be built on campus. The date of the reception for its launch will be announced later this month.

The Huntington Beach-based engineering firm Gossamer Space Frame has generously provided their know-how to build MA:P. The progress of MA:P from classroom, to crowdsourcing at community workshops, to its construction near the Walter Pyramid has been documented by design critic Brigette Brown on the UAM Tumblr blog.

About Materials & Applications:

Located in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles, M&A is an experimental site and community "pocket park." Begun by Jenna Didier as a collaborative endeavor to advance a vision of architecture and design as social catalyst, she and the M&A exhibitors have striven to raise the conceptual standards of public art by questioning not only what is possible in the built environment, but also who participates in its development. M&A received a Spirit Award in 2009 from the Neutra Foundation. The American Institute of Architects presented M&A with three Design Honor Awards: in 2006 for two installations--the 2005 project Maximilian's Schell by Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues and the 2006 project Here There Be Monsters by Workshop LEVITAS and DidierHess--and in 2007 for Michael FoxLin project Bubbles. For ID Magazine's 52nd Annual Design Review, jurors Michael Arad, Elizabeth Diller, and Lindy Roy honored the Ball and Nogues installation Maximilian's Schell with the designation "Best Environment."

Organized by UAM Curator Kristina Newhouse, Materials & Applications: Building Something (Beyond) Beautiful, Projects 2002 – 2013 and the MA:P activities have been awarded a 2013 NEA Art Works: Design grant.

MA:P has received generous support from the Huntington Beach-based space frame firm Gossamer Innovations.

Mona Lisa, 2003
Japanese cypress, seashell, natural pigment, lacquer
8.27 x 5.31 x 2.76 inches Collection of Kelly Sutherlin McLeod and Steve McLeod
© Bidou Yamaguchi

Zõ-onna (Middle-Age Woman) 1998
Japanese cypress, seashell, natural pigment, lacquer
8.27 x 5.31 x 2.76 inches Collection of Kelly Sutherlin McLeod and Steve McLeod
© Bidou Yamaguchi

Traditions Transfigured: The Noh Masks of Bidou Yamaguchi

January 25 - April 13, 2014

The human face and its expressive potential have inspired artists around the world for millennia. Arguably, Japan's Noh theater provides an unparalleled domain for exploring emotion and representing the human countenance. Today, Noh continues to inspire a dynamic dialogue between artists from Asia and the west. Expanding on this rich vein, Traditions Transfigured selects contemporary works by Noh mask maker Bidou Yamaguchi. These masks apply the forms, techniques, transformative spirit, and mysterious elegance of Noh masks to iconic female portraits from the European art historical canon, and to Kabuki actor prints by Sharaku, Japan's enigmatic 18th century portrait master.

The exhibition catalogue (distributed by University of Washington Press) analyzes how Bidou's work radically extends Noh's emphasis on the transformation of souls across time and space into new cultural and physical dimensions. By transfiguring both European and Japanese artistic traditions, Bidou's work merges past and present. More importantly, it allows contemporary audiences to uncover deeper dimensions of their own humanity. By imagining ourselves wearing different faces, we can forge deeper connections with others.

The exhibition was curated by Interim Director of Museum Studies, Dr. Kendall H. Brown, with B. Karenina Karyadi, Lauren Nochella, Kristy Odett, and Ariana Rizo. For these students, it partially fulfills a requirement for the CSULB Graduate program in Museum and Curatorial Studies. Traditions Transfigured is made possible by generous funding from the McLeod Family Foundation, Instructional Related Activities, California State University, Long Beach (CSULB), and Associated Students, Inc, CSULB. The UAM staff deserves special thanks for their support and advice throughout the process.

CSULB logotwitter facebook youtube tumblr pinterest