California State University, Long Beach
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Author of the Month

Forensic Psychology: The Use of Behavioral Science in Civil and Criminal Justice and Criminal Procedure for the Criminal Justice Professional

Hank Fradella, Professor and Chair, Criminal Justice

Books by Hank Fradella

Debuting in 2008 from Wadsworth Publishing, Forensic Psychology: The Use of Behavioral Science in Civil and Criminal Justice and Criminal Procedure for the Criminal Justice Professional are the third and fourth books from Fradella, who joined the university in August 2007 as chair of the Criminal Justice Department. Fradella described Forensic Psychology as a way to teach the subject to criminal justice majors without assuming they have a background in psychology. “Moreover,  other texts focus on the psychology research to such an extent that they fail to integrate case law and statutes which are the issues criminal justice majors need to worry about,” he said. “I wanted to write a book that would approach forensic psychology from a criminal justice perspective.” The second book, Criminal Procedure, is the latest of nine editions in a series that began 30 years ago. “While the series continues to have a major impact, the publishers recognized that the book became outdated,” said Fradella. “I updated the text and removed the old case law which represented a massive overhaul of an 850-page text.” One reason Fradella feels Wadsworth published his work twice in one year is their recognition of his skills as a synthesizer. “I can synthesize complex legal materials and explain them in a manner that undergraduate students can understand,” he said. “They also like working with me because I meet deadlines.” Fradella received a bachelor’s in psychology from Clark University in 1990. He then earned a master’s in forensic science and a law degree in 1993 from George Washington University before attending Arizona State University for his doctorate in Justice Studies in 1997. He comes to CSULB from 12 years as a professor of law, criminology and justice studies at the College of New Jersey in Ewing, N.J.