California State University, Long Beach
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Distinguished Faculty Scholarly, Creative Achievement Awards

Published: July 1, 2010

Lijuan Li

Chemistry & Biochemistry

Awardee portrait
Lijuan Li

Lijuan Li’s research has a magnetic effect on external grants, drawing six to campus, totaling more than $1.4 million. These funds are all individual research grants, not funding obtained as a co-principal investigator or part of an institutional grant. As a co-principal investigator, she obtained funding for $249,000 from the National Science Foundation for the purchase of an instrument and funding for more than 20 undergraduate students.

Li’s research will help the neuroscience, physiology and medicinal research communities to understand the diverse biological functions of nitric oxide and its metal complexes, some of which include controlling blood pressure, preventing platelet aggregation, acting as biological messengers and immune system cytotoxic agents, and assisting with long-term memory. The kinetic data will be used to identify the nitric oxide releasing metal complexes, which could be used in cardiovascular muscle relaxation, cancer therapy, pharmacokinetic studies, and other medicinal applications.

Since 1998, Li has produced 25 peer-reviewed publications in such prestigious journals as the Journal of American Chemistry Society, Chemical Communication and Inorganic Chemistry.

She has an ability to attract many undergraduate and graduate students to her research. Within the last 10 years, Dr. Li has directed 14 graduate students and 37 undergraduate students’ research activities. Many of these students have co-authored publications or presented their work at scientific conferences. Li and her students have presented a total of 66 papers at regional/national/international conferences since 1998. Since that same year, Li has presented 29 invited talks and seminars at other institutions and conferences, which is unprecedented in the department.

In addition, Li was named the winner of the Award for Research Excellence from the college of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

Carl Lipo

Anthropology

Awardee portrait
Carl Lipo

Carl Lipo’s upcoming book, “The Statues That Walked: What the West Has To Learn From Easter Island” from the Free Press Imprint of Simon and Schuster, reflects an interest that has drawn him again and again to the lonely and mysterious rock in the Pacific Ocean.

Lipo has traveled to Easter Island five times, most recently in 2009 when he worked with CSULB, high school, and community college faculty members there as part of the Geoscience Diversity Enhancement Project funded by the National Science Foundation. The goal was to introduce to the faculty members and, through them, to their students, how to use non-destructive techniques to study and generate data to build a scientific understanding of the island’s monumental statues and prehistory. Lipo used remote sensing technology used to collect information on environmental variability, which he also used to study prehistoric deposits in Guatemala, California, and the Mississippi River valley.

Lipo is a co-founder of the Institute of Integrated Research on Environments Materials and Societies (IIRMES), one of the most advanced research laboratories in the California State University system. It is a collaborative research center developed by faculty from the colleges of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and Liberal Arts that provides access to state-of-the-art analytical equipment for CSULB faculty and students as well as scientists from other institutions for research in the natural, physical and social sciences studies. Lipo established the CSULB Luminescence Dating Laboratory within IIRMES to conduct routine luminescence dating of ceramics and fine-grained sediments. He also worked on a huge archaeological dig in Pakistan from 1987-90 where he studied a 5,000-year-old city in research funded by the National Geographic, the University of Wisconsin and UC Berkeley.

Marshall Medoff

Economics

Awardee portrait
Marshall Medoff

Marshall Medoff is one of the most prolific researchers in the College of Liberal Arts. In the 30 years that he has been a faculty member, he has published more than 75 articles. During the last five years, when many faculty members who have been teaching as long as he has are planning their retirements, he has published 21 articles. He is widely recognized outside CSULB and cited frequently for his research on women’s reproductive health issues.

After completing his doctorate at UC Berkeley, Medoff began a career of scientific investigation that touched on such topics as racial and sexual discrimination, the incidence of suicide and gun laws, who are the most productive economists and, beginning in the late 1990s, abortion. He has published 21 articles on various aspects of the subject and is now widely recognized in the fields of demography, sociology, psychology, public policy and political science for his scholarship.

Medoff is currently at work on a book “Abortion, Sexual Activity and Social Policy,” which will trace the evolution of the theoretical and empirical research on the demand for the procedure. The focus of the book is to review all the existing literature on the topic including demographic and economic factors, public policy, provider availability, political and public attitudes, anti-abortion activities, restrictive state abortion laws, pregnancy rates, sexual activity and adoptions as well as their implications for public policy.

Medoff looks back on a research career at CSULB he finds rewarding, prolific and satisfying. The university agrees.

Mark Ruwedel

Art

Awardee portrait
Mark Ruwedel

Landscape artist Mark Ruwedel continues his exploration through photography of the 19th, 20th and 21st century, mapping occupation and expropriation of western North America’s landscape.

His series, “Westward the Course of Empire,” photographed between 1994 and 2007, retraces the railroad lines that once crisscrossed the West. Published by Yale Art Gallery in 2008, “Westward” has been singled out for critical acclaim by Artforum, one of the foremost international contemporary art journals. Ruwedel pursued the project for nearly 14 years, photographing the remains of more than 130 railroad lines in the western US and Canada. His work represents his sustained investigations into the relationships between the natural world and the actions of human cultures and technologies upon it. It has been exhibited at such spaces as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, Gallery Luisotti in Santa Monica and Galerie Francoise Paviot in Paris.

Ruwedel is the author of three more photographic collections, “The Hanford Stretch” published in 1993, “The Italian Navigator” which came out in 2001 and “Written on the Land”, a survey published in 2002. His work has been reviewed and reproduced in the New York Times, the Guardian, the Atlantic Monthly, the Los Angeles Times, Art Week, Art in America, Afterimage, the Toronto Star, American Art and the Photo Review. His work has been acquired by such museums as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Yale Art Gallery, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Copenhagen National Museum of Photography.

–Richard Manly
Photos by Robert Freligh