Skip to Local Navigation
Skip to Content
California State University, Long Beach
California State University Long Beach Assessment and Testing Secondary Banner
Print this pageAdd this page to your favoritesSelect a font sizeSelect a small fontSelect a medium fontSelect a large font
 

Division of Student Services
Tables of Student Learning Outcomes

Click on the departments below to view student learning outcomes and status reports for 2012-2013:

Go to Top

Career Development Center (CDC)  
Student Learning Outcome

Freshmen engineering students enrolled in Engineering 102 will identify their interests based on Holland’s theory of types and relate these areas to validate their major selection or to consider other options.

Measurement Tool

Pre-Post assessment and Strong Interest Inventory

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Integration, & Application Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Competence Practical Competence

Status

This project was conducted during spring 2013.

The following assessment questions from the pre-assessment and post-assessment A address Part 1 of the Learning Outcomes Statement ( freshmen engineering students enrolled in Engineering 102 will identify their interests based on Holland’s theory of types):

  • I know what my likes and dislikes are as they relate to a career in engineering

  • I am able to associate my engineering major with career-related interests

  • I know what careers interest me

Part 2 (Students will relate these areas to validate their major selection, or prompt them to consider other options) is addressed by post-assessment B questions:

  • I am confident in my choice of major

  • Completing the iStartStrong helped me to validate my choice of major

  • Completing the iStartStrong helped me to consider other major options

Results indicate positive growth in knowledge acquisition. From the sample group of 144 students who completed the pre and post assessment A, results indicate 12% increase in students who knew what their likes and dislikes were as they related to a career in engineering. The smaller sample of 28 students saw a more significant increase of 29%. Additional facts that support positive learning include a 7% growth in being able to associate the engineering major with career related interests from the larger sample and 18% increase for the smaller sample.

Addressing Part 2 of the Learning Outcomes Statement, 57% of students agreed or strongly agreed that completing the iStartStrong helped them validate their choice of major. In addition, 89% felt that the iStartStrong helped them to consider other major options.

The information gathered through group interviews further supports positive growth and increased learning. While the overall response to taking the iStartStrong was positive, students also shared a few negative responses. Most students believed the personality inventory affirmed their choice of major. However, they also appreciated the other options that were presented to them. Some looked at those options as a fallback plan if the major “didn’t work out” for them, while others thought that they would add a minor based on one of their options.

Overall, there was low student awareness of the day-to-day tasks of engineers in their respective areas. Students requested opportunities to meet with current professionals in the field. This can help inform departments to include such experiential learning opportunities in the course curriculum, help inform Career Center programming and job development, and help develop and maintain collaborative partnerships between the CDC and campus departments.

Students perceive that involvement in engineering-related student organizations will help them learn more about the “real world” of engineering. Many students also spoke of getting internships to help them learn more about what actually goes on in the day-to-day work of engineering.

 

Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
Student Learning Outcome

As a result of participating in individual counseling (intake assessment and follow-up sessions), students will report improvement in their emotional/psychological well-being and a reduction in the degree that personal problems interfere with their academic performance.

Measurement Tool

Counseling Experience, Self-reported  responses to survey questions

Relevant Framework

 Healthy Behavior / Satisfying and Productive Lifestyles

Status

Two times a year, CAPS evaluates student counseling experiences by administering a student evaluation of their experiences in receiving services at CAPS.  They are asked to evaluate their current well being after beginning their counseling experience. Over the last six years, student responses have indicated significant positive gains in their overall well-being and their ability to not let personal problems interfere with academic performance.  The next survey will be conducted in early November, 2013.

Results:

  • At intake, 59% of clients reported that their personal problems “extremely” or “very much” interfered with their academic performance before coming to counseling.  This number dropped to 24.5% after receiving counseling.
  • At intake, 68.8% reported their overall well-being to be “poor” or “extremely poor.”  After receiving counseling, only 9.45% of clients described their overall well-being as “poor” or “extremely poor.”
  • Regarding overall satisfaction of CAPS’ services, 60% of CAPS clients reported being “very satisfied” and 34.95% “satisfied (combined 95.8%) with their overall experience at CAPS.

 

Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Office of the Dean of Students

Student Learning Outcome
As a result of attending the "Ethics at the Beach" seminar, students will be able to identify at least three steps for formulating a set of personal principles and list two techniques for applying their ethical principles in difficult ethical situations.
Measurement Tool
Pre/post event questionnaire
Relevant Framework
Leadership development
Status

On November 2, 2012, the annual Ethics at The Beach seminar was co-sponsored by the Associated Business Students Organization Council (ABSOC), Ukleja Center for Ethical Leadership and The Law Society at The Pointe in the Walter Pyramid.

Professor Hannah Nguyen volunteered to have two of her graduate assistants assist the planning committee in designing, administering and analyzing pre and posttests.  To ensure a high response rate on the pre-test, the instrument was made as concise and easy-to-fill out as possible.  Participants assessed the extent of their current abilities to formulate a set of personal principles and identify techniques to apply their leadership principles in difficult ethical situations.  A Likert scale was used with ratings of 1-5, where “1” = a little and “5” = a great deal.

Fr. Robert Spitzer, Ph.D., President of the Spitzer Center and former president of Gonzaga University gave the keynote speech on ethical leadership. In his presentation, Fr. Spitzer described four steps for forming a set of personal principles:

Step 1 – Use five commonly held principles:

  •  Do not do unnecessary harm to others.

  • Do not steal from others.

  • Do not lie to others.

  • Do not be unfair to others.

  • Do not cheat.

Step 2 – Form your own set of principles by adding to or modifying the five common principles.

Step 3 – Translate your principles into questions you must ask yourself before any significant leadership decision.

Step 4 – Put the following principle at the beginning of your list of principles:  “I do not use my good ends or purposes to justify an evil means of achieving those ends.”

Posttest Results

Of the 187 participants, 82% of students (155) who were able to identify step #2 of the four-step process that Fr. Spitzer described for formulating a set of personal principles.  Only 28% were able to identify step #1, 9% identified step #3, and 20% identified step #4.

When asked to list 2 techniques for applying their leadership principles in difficult ethical situations, 162 students responded.  Of that number, 97% were able to list at least two.  The remaining students listed one technique.   Thirteen percent of all attendees failed to respond to this question.

Comparison of Pre and Posttest Results

Of the participants, 128 completed a pretest and posttest. Paired samples t-tests were conducted. 

Formulating Personal Principles

Students rated their ability to formulate their own personal principles significantly higher after the seminar (M=4.46, SD=0.59) than before the seminar (M=3.84, SD=0.93), t(123) = 6.85, p <.001.

Identifying Techniques to Apply Principles

Students also rated their ability to identify techniques to apply their principles in difficult ethical situations significantly higher after the seminar (M=4.11, SD = 0.69) than before the seminar (M=3.42, SD=0.95, t(126) = 7.09, p <.001.

 

Use of Findings

The findings suggest a significant increase in students’ perceptions of their abilities for the two learning outcomes.  However, the only way to measure whether the learning is sustainable and actually applied is to design an assessment to be administered at some point after the seminar takes place. The co-organizers of Ethics at The Beach will work with the keynote speaker (who has already been identified) for the November 1, 2013 seminar on a follow-up to measure long term benefits.

Go to Top

Disabled Student Services (DSS)

Student Learning Outcome

Students with autism or asperger's syndrome who regularly participate in the Learning Independence for Empowerment (LIFE) project will be able to navigate the campus independently and will develop skills necessary for successful social interaction.

Measurement Tool

Peer coaching program data collection:

Intake assessment

End of semester assessment

Relevant Framework

Independence

Interpersonal and Intrapersonal competence

Status

Fifteen students participated in peer coaching with goals and objectives established at the outset. All 15 students met all three goals at least 80% accuracy. Out of 20 students who participated in the total LIFE Project. 12 attended on aweekly basis. All students reported satisfactory progress with their self-monitoring goals. Students reported improvement in their overall abilities to navigate the campus successfully and initiate conversations with both peers and professors. Data from the intake assessment were compared to data collected at the end of the semester.

This study suggests that students with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome benefit greatly from peer support and guidance to improve independence in interpersonal/intrapersonal competence. One limitation of this research is that other life experiences not measured in this study may have impacted the results.

Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Educational Equity Services: Student Support Services Program

Student Learning Outcome
After completing the Financial Literacy 101 modules, 90% of participants will have actively completed a personal financial plan and scholarship personal statement essay. Ninety percent of participants will indicate increased self-efficacy related to personal finance goals and financial self-assessment.
Measurement Tool

Pre and post self-assessment

Financial Literacy 101 assessments and plans

Scholarship personal statement essay  

Relevant Framework

Intellectual Growth

Personal & Educational Goals

Status

Data from a six-month pilot show that while these benchmarks were too high in the initial year, participants indicated significant growth in these skills. In the preliminary cohort, 72.9% of all program participants completed at least one module and 77% of them passed with a C or better. 95% of participants indicated increased overall self-efficacy and personal knowledge. 

Use of Findings

Though the pilot suggested success in the implementation, promotion and completion of the Financial Literacy 101 program during a six month pilot, we identified areas for improvement to reach the high benchmarks set for the 2013-14 year. To increase the amount and depth of information available to participants each year, we augmented the general 101 module into four modules corresponding with each academic class (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior) and added content to each. We also plan to add common questions across the pre and post self-assessments in each of these new modules so data can be aggregated.  We also implemented bi-weekly checks on completion and success rates to increase student usage and passing rates, and are already witnessing substantial progress.

Go to Top

Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of attending the EOP Freshman Orientation in Summer 2013, students will improve their awareness in the following areas of financial aid: deadlines, document retrieval process and the differences between grants and loans.

Measurement Tool

Pre-Test Information (EOP Orientation Summer 2013), Post-Test Survey (EOP 100 in Fall 2013)

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition and Application

Status
 
Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Judicial Affairs

Student Learning Outcome
Students who commit plagiarism and receive counseling from Judicial Affairs will understand the inappropriate behavior that lead to their referral to Judicial Affairs, and will learn how to use APA citation style correctly.
Measurement Tool

Essay assignment given to the student pertaining to his or her understanding of plagiarism; scored using a five-point rubric

APA test

Relevant Framework

Realistic Self-appraisal

Knowledge Acquisition

Status
In progress
Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Multicultural Center

Student Learning Outcome
Students who participate in the "Students Talk About Race: (STAR) workshop will be able to display knowledge of three core elements of cross-cultural competency, correctly match definitions of key terms related to diversity, and identify three strategies for effective cross-communication.
Measurement Tool
Post workshop questionnaire and quiz
Relevant Framework

Appreciating Diversity

Effective Communication

Status
In progress
Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Student Health Services

Student Learning Outcome
Students participating in the HRC Peer Educator program will increase knowledge of college health education topics, increase self-efficacy regarding provision of health education to other students, and provide peer health education to college students at least three times.
Measurement Tool

Pre-test newly employed peer educators, including volunteers, interns, and student assistants prior to training

Posttest peer educators after three months

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisiton, Integration, & Application

Realistic Self-Appraisal

Status
Peer Educator Summary Report
Use of Findings
Please click on the link above.

Go to Top

Student Life & Development (SLD)

Student Learning Outcome

Students participating in the Men’s Success Initiative (MSI) program will increase their level of engagement on campus by building connections with faculty, staff, students, and resources on campus. 

Measurement Tool

Students will be assessed with regard to their past history of usage of campus resources and support programs and the frequency of their self-initiated interactions with faculty as well as support staff and other students on campus.

Relevant Framework

Practical Competence

Persistence and Academic Achievement

Status
 
Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Student Orientation, Advising, & Registration (SOAR)

Student Learning Outcome

Freshmen who participate in the Overnight Program will be able to identify key campus resources, their location and mission.

Measurement Tool

Pre and Post Assessment

Relevant Framework

Practical Competence

Status
 
Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

Student Recreation and Wellness Center

Student Learning Outcome

SRWC participants who attend the Junkyard Fitness class over the course of six week class will improve strength, speed, agility and body mechanics. 

Measurement Tool

Pre- and post-physical assessment and pre- and post-self-perceived physical inventory. 

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Integration, and Application

Status
Because of a low participation rate in the spring semester, the full assessment of the learning outcome could not be completed.  The assessment will occur again in the fall semester with the results reported after completion.
Use of Findings
TBD

Go to Top

Testing, Evaluation & Assessment (TEA)
Student Learning Outcome
Students who participate in the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), complete a follow-up questionnaire, and receive advisement based on their CLA scores will demonstrate significant growth in their critical writing skills after two semesters.
Measurement Tool
Collegiate Learning Assessment, Post CLA questionnaire, Post Essay
Relevant Framework

Intellectual Growth

Effective communication

Status
 
Use of Findings
 

Go to Top

University Student Union (USU)

Student Learning Outcome

After completion of one year of service with the University Student Union Program Council, volunteer staff members will be able to demonstrate how to effectively implement a student program, including demonstrating how to negotiate and complete entertainment contracts, assess and manage event risk, develop event marketing strategies, and conduct post-event assessments.

Measurement Tool

Pre- and post-service year assessment

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Integration, and Application

Status
Of the volunteer staff members on the USU Program Council, all were evaluated on their performance and learning by the USU Program Coordinator throughout and at the completion of the academic year. Eleven out of 14 volunteers successfully demonstrated how to implement a student event or program.  Six of the 14 volunteers were proficient in contract negotiations and contract completion.  Seven of the 14 volunteers appropriately assessed and managed event risk.  Ten of the 14 volunteers adequately developed and completed marketing strategies.  Finally, 12 of the 14 volunteers were successful at conducting post-event assessments.
Use of Findings
The USU Program Coordinator and Assistant Director for Programs will re-evaluate the Program Council training program to determine the effectiveness in contract negotiations and risk assessment and management.  The results of this learning outcome demonstrate a need for improvement in these areas.

Go to Top

Veterans Affairs Services

Student Learning Outcome

Student veterans who attend the New Student Veteran Orientation will learn the process for receiving Veterans Administration educational benefits while studying at CSULB.

Measurement Tool

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the certification process by successfully submitting all forms required to receive VA educational benefits to the Veterans Affairs Services Office.

Relevant Framework

Persistence and Academic Achievement

Status
 
Use of Findings
 

Timeline for 2012-13

Go to Top

Due dates

Activity

Participants

August 15, 2012 Student Learning Outcomes Grant Application Due Students Services Departments
August 24, 2012

Student Learning Outcomes Statements Due

Grant winners ammounced at annual post-convocation managers' meeting

Student Services Managers and Staff

 

Student Services Managers

October 1, 2012 Student Learning Outcomes Statements for 2012-2013 posted on CSULB Assessment Website Student Learning Outcomes Committee
January 18, 2013 Student Learning Outcomes Workshop Student Services Managers and Staff
May 31, 2013 Student Learning Outcomes report for 2012-2013 due Student Services Managers and Staff
June 7, 2013 Student Services Managers' Retreat Student Services Managers
October 2013 Student Learning Outcomes Workshop Presentations by 2012 SLO Grant Recipients

Go to Top