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General Policies and Regulations

University Policies and Regulations Information

CSULB Coffee Shop

Changes in Rules and Policies

Although every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information in this Catalog, students and others who use this Catalog should note that laws, rules, and policies change from time to time and that these changes may alter the information contained in this publication. Changes may come in the form of statutes enacted by the Legislature, rules and policies adopted by the Board of Trustees of the California State University, by the Chancellor or designee of the California State University, or by the President or CSULB designee. It is not possible in a publication of this size to include all of the rules, policies and other information that pertain to students, the institution, and the California State University. More current or complete information may be obtained from the appropriate department, college, or administrative office.

Nothing in this Catalog will be construed as, operate as, or have the effect of an abridgment or a limitation of any rights, powers, or privileges of the Board of Trustees of the California State University, the Chancellor of the California State University, or the President of the campus. The Trustees, the Chancellor, and the President are authorized by law to adopt, amend, or repeal rules and policies which apply to students. This Catalog does not constitute a contract or the terms and conditions of a contract between the student and CSULB or the California State University. The relationship of the student to the institution is one governed by statute, rules, and policy adopted by the Legislature, the Trustees, the Chancellor, the President, and their duly authorized designees. Information concerning grievance procedures for students who feel aggrieved in their relationships with the university, its policies, practices, and procedures, or its faculty and staff, may be found in the Student Grievance Procedure policy later on in this section.

The Federal Military Selective Service Act (the "Act") requires most males residing in the United States to present themselves for registration with the Selective Service System within thirty days of their eighteenth birthday. Most males between the ages of 18 and 25 must be registered. Males born after December 31, 1959, may be required to submit a statement of compliance with the Act and regulations in order to receive any grant, loan, or work assistance under specified provisions of existing federal law. In California, students subject to the Act who fail to register are also ineligible to receive any need-based student grants funded by the state or a public postsecondary institution.

Selective Service registration forms are available at any U.S. Post Office, and many high schools have a staff member or teacher appointed as a Selective Service Registrar. Applicants for financial aid can also request that information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) be used to register them with the Selective Service. Information on the Selective Service System is available and the registration process may be initiated online at www.sss.gov.

Information concerning the academic programs of CSULB may be obtained from the Academic Vice President, BH 303, at (562) 985-4128 and may include:

1. the current degree programs and other educational and training programs;
2. the instructional, laboratory, and other physical plant facilities which relate to the academic program;
3. the faculty and other instructional personnel;
4. data regarding student retention at CSULB and, if available, the number and percentage of students completing the program in which the student is enrolled or has expressed interest; and
5. the names of associations, agencies, or governmental bodies which accredit, approve, or license the institution and its programs, and the procedures under which any current or prospective student may obtain or review upon request a copy of the documents describing the institution's accreditation, approval, or licensing.

Graduation Rates


Graduation Rates for All Freshmen


Fall Term - 6 Year Grad % - Estimated Eventual Grad %

2001 - 46.0 -58.7
2000 - 47.1 - 58.5
1999 - 45.6 - 57.3
1998 - 46.2 - 58.4
1997 - 41.6 - 54.8
1996 - 38.8 - 53.2

CSULB has an obligation, under the federal Student Right-To-Know law, to provide information regarding graduation rates to prospective and current students. The most widely used measure of graduation is the "six-year freshman cohort rate," which expresses the percentage of students who began as freshmen and who complete their degrees within six years at the same campus where they began studies. Although important, this measure does not provide complete information because some take longer than six years to graduate, some come as transfer students, and some attend several undergraduate institutions before receiving baccalaureate degrees. The tables here show both 6-year cohort rates and estimated eventual graduation rates1 for both freshmen and transfer students.

About 59% of CSULB freshmen eventually earn baccalaureate degrees and about 46% do so within six years. Over the past decade, these rates have increased substantially and indicators for currently enrolled students suggest continued increases will occur. Students are also graduating more quickly than in past years. Recent graduates took an average of 5.18 years to complete baccalaureate degrees (for the group whose degrees were awarded in the college year 2006-2007).

Graduation Rates for All Transfer Students


Fall Term - 4 Year Grad % - Estimated Eventual Grad %

2003 - 59.7 - 70.4
2002 - 60.8 - 70.3
2001 - 59.8 - 69.8
2000 - 60.9 - 71.0
1999 - 58.5 - 68.9

About 70% of CSULB transfer students eventually earn baccalaureate degrees and about 60% do so within four years of transferring. These rates have been increasing and students are graduating more quickly than in past years. Students who began as junior transfers graduated in an average of 2.91 years (for the cohort whose degrees were awarded in the college year 2006-2007).

Since it takes several years to complete a college degree, currently graduation rates are indicative of CSULB at the time these cohorts entered (2001 and before for freshmen and 2003 and before for transfers). CSULB is continually working to raise graduation rates by improving class availability, advising, curriculum, and other student support services. CSULB's current graduation rates are similar to other public, comprehensive universities. However, the CSULB's rate of improvement has been rapid and the campus is on a trajectory to continue raise graduation rates and to reduce time to degree. These are currently top priorities for the campus.

Completing the degree in a reasonable period of time is an important goal for students (and their parents). The number of courses (and course units) that must be completed to earn a degree, 120-140 units is typically equivalent to about 40-47 three-unit courses (although courses can equate to one to four or more units). At CSULB, degrees in engineering, sciences and the arts generally require the largest number of courses (and units).

Earning a 120-unit degree within four years requires full time attendance (15 units per semester). Full time attendance is a "full-time job" and requires about 45 hours per week attending class and studying. Completing a degree with a higher unit requirement in a reasonable time requires attending winter session, summer session and/or attending longer than four years.

More detailed data can be found at the CSULB Institutional Research web site.

1 Estimated eventual graduation rates are based on a methodology developed by the California State University system that takes into consideration the number of students still enrolled in good academic standing at the six-year point in time.

Accreditation


The University is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501, 510-748-9001), the agency responsible for granting regional accreditation to colleges and universities in California, Hawaii, and Guam. It is accredited by the California State Board of Education and is on the list of approved institutions of the American Association of University Women. Additional information concerning University accreditation may be obtained from the Office of the Provost. Additional information concerning departmentalaccreditation may be obtained from the department concerned or the Office of the Provost.

• American Language Institute, UCES - Commission on English Language Program Accreditation, 1725 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314-3457, phone: 703-519-2070

• Art - National Association of Schools of Art and Design, 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190, phone: 703-437-0700

• Business Administration - Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business - International, 600 Emerson Road, Suite 300, St. Louis, MO 63141-6762, phone: 314-872-8481

• Chemistry (undergraduate) - American Chemical Society, Committee of Professional Training, 1155 Sixteenth St., NW, Washington, DC 20036, phone: 202-872-4589

• Communicative Disorders (graduate) - American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Council on Academic Accreditation, 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852, phone: 301-897-5700

• Computer Science (undergraduate) - Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC) of Computer Science Accreditation Board (CSAB),111 Market Place, Suite #1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, phone: 410-347-7703

• Dance - National Association of Schools of Dance, 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190, phone: 703-437-0700

• Design - National Association of Schools of Art and Design, 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190, phone: 703-437-0700

• Dietetics (didactic program) - Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education, American Dietetics Association, 216 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, phone: 312-899-0040, ext. 5400

• Education - National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 2010 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036-1023, phone: 202-466-7496

• Engineering (undergraduate: Aerospace, Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Engineering Technology, Mechanical) - Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite #1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, phone: 410-347-7710

• Family and Consumer Sciences - American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, Council for Accreditation, 1555 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, phone: 703-706-4600; and Commission on Accreditation/Approval for Dietetics Education, American Dietetic Association, 216 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 800, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, phone: 312-899-4872

• Health Science (graduate) - Council on Education for Public Health, 1015 Fifteenth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005, phone: 202-789-1050

• Kinesiotherapy - Commission on Accreditation on Allied Health Education Programs, 35 East Wacker Drive, Suite 1970, Chicago, IL 60601-2208, phone: 7312-553-9355

• Music - National Association of Schools of Music, 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190, phone: 703-437-0700

• Nursing - Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 1 Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, phone: 202-887-6791

• Physical Therapy - Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, American Physical Therapy Association, Transpotomac Plaza, 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, phone: 703-706-3245

• Public Policy and Administration - National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, Commission on Peer Review and Accreditation, 1120 G Street, NW, Suite 730, Washington, DC 20005, phone: 202-628-8965

• Radiation Therapy - Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60606-2901, phone: 312-704-5300

• Recreation and Leisure Studies - National Recreation and Park Association, Council on Accreditation, 22377 Belmont Ridge Road, Ashburn, VA 20148, phone: 703-858-0784

• Social Work - Council on Social Work Education, Commission on Accreditation, 1725 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314, phone: 703-519-2044

• Theatre Arts - National Association of Schools of Theatre, 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190, phone: 703-437-0700

• University Art Museum - American Association of Museums, Suite 200, 1225 Eye St., NW, Washington, DC 20005, phone: 202-289-1818

CSULB Principles of Shared Community


CSULB affirms the importance of democratic and transparent decision-making processes as a shared community. The University believes that all members of the University community have not only a right, but also a responsibility, to participate in the governance of this community. Therefore, the University is committed to providing an opportunity for all its members - faculty, students, staff, and administrators - to join in the decision making process either through direct participation or representative governance.

CSULB is committed to creating a community in which a diverse population of students and employees can learn and work while they share in creating an atmosphere of tolerance, civility, and respect for the rights and sensibilities of each individual. (Policy 07-09)

CSULB Statement on Civility and Acts of Violence


California State University, Long Beach, takes pride in its tradition of maintaining a civil and non-violent learning, working, and social environment. Civility and mutual respect toward all members of the University community are intrinsic to the establishment of excellence in teaching and learning. They also contribute to the maintenance of a safe and productive workplace and overall healthy campus climate.

The University espouses and practices zero tolerance for violence against any member of the University community (i.e., students, faculty, staff, administrators, and visitors). Violence and threats of violence not only disrupt the campus environment, they also negatively impact the University's ability to foster open dialogue and a free exchange of ideas among all campus constituencies.

To fulfill this policy, the University strives: 1) to prevent violence from occurring; and 2) to enforce local, state, and federal laws, as well as University regulations, regarding such conduct. The University also has established procedures for resolving and/or adjudicating circumstances involving violence, as well as threats of violence. A threat of violence is an expression of intention that implies impending physical injury, abuse, or damage to an individual or his/her belongings. All allegations of such incidents (i.e., acts and threats) will be aggressively investigated. Allegations that are sustained may result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from employment, expulsion from the University, and/or civil and criiminal prosecution.

Members of the campus community are encouraged to promptly report any acts of violence, threats of violence, or other behavior which by intent, act, or outcome harm themselves or others. (Approved October 1997.)

The Principles: Equal Access and Opportunity, Non-discrimination/Non-harassment


California State University, Long Beach is a comprehensive, urban university. The University has a professional, cultural and ethnical commitment to provide a climate that enables each individual to realize his/her potential for excellence and that nurtures academic growth and professional development.

Diversity is both an ideal and an imperative. California State University, Long Beach takes pride in its student body and employees, and affirms that this diversity enriches the work and learning environment of the campus. For this reason, the recognition of diversity in our University community extends beyond the limits established by federal or state laws or regulations.

In addition to fully meeting its obligations of nondiscrimination under federal and state law, CSULB is committed to creating a community in which a diverse population can learn, live, and work in an atmosphere of tolerance, civility, and respect for the rights and sensibilities of each individual, without regard to professional rank, employment status, economic status, ethnic background, political views, or other personal characteristics or beliefs.

CSULB takes seriously its tradition of maintaining civility and mutual respect toward all members of the University community. These qualities are intrinsic to the establishment of excellence in teaching and learning. They also contribute to the maintenance of a productive workplace and an overall positive campus climate. Civility and mutual respect thrive only when equal opportunity and access exist, and when retaliation for exercising rights, privileges and obligations is not feared. (Policy 03-09)

Perrin Reid, Director of Equity & Diversity, is the designated campus coordinator for equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, and civil rights.

Policy Promoting Equal Employment and Educational Opportunity


California State University, Long Beach affirms the equal worth of every individual and of distinctive groups of people, and fosters fair and equal treatment and access for all members of the university community. Therefore, the University is committed to the principles of equal opportunity in education and employment, to policies and practices that ensure equal opportunity and consideration, and to the protection of civil rights.

It is the policy of California State University, Long Beach to provide programs, services, and benefits, including employment, without regard to race, religion, color, ancestry, ethnicity, gender, marital status, pregnancy, national origin, age, mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, special disabled veterans' status, Vietnam-Era or other protected veterans status. (Policy 03-09)

Reasonable accommodation to disability is considered a means of establishing equal opportunity.