Department of Geography

College of Liberal Arts

California State University, Long Beach

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Abstracts of Conference Presentations

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Dr. Dmitrii Sidorov

is presenting:

"Visualizing post-Soviet Russia" to the California Geographical Society meeting in Yosemite, April 2005.

Russia remains one of the most dynamic world regions. This provides both exciting opportunities and significant challenges for instructors. This paper attempts to critically evaluate the current status of teaching Russia-related courses in the US, and provide some suggestions for further improvements. The paper will discuss best strategies to get students interested in learning about worlds biggest and most dynamic country. In particular, this paper will discuss the importance of applying perhaps the most effective teaching tool, visualization.

Dr. Sidorov presented:

"Geography of construction wars in Moscow: Infill high-rise constructions and the emergence of municipal civil society" to the Association of American Geographers meeting in Denver, April 2005.

In the last several years Moscow has been experiencing a boom in construction of high-rise residencies which dramatically rescales and reterritorializes the city. Often taking the form of infill constructions, these new towers alter the traditional urban landscape inherited from the Soviet period. This paper looks, in particular, at protest civic responses to this rescaling of the city and their geography. In the spirit of Chekhovs The Cherry Orchard, the very local conflict cases over new constructions in the city reflect the larger transformation of power in the society.

Dr. Sidorov presented:

"The Corporatization of Public Space in Post-Soviet Moscow" to the Association of American Geographers meeting in New Orleans, March 2003.

The various recent grand architectural projects of the Moscow authorities are intended to present the city as a successful case of free-market reforms. A closer look at the way the city is managed and developing reveals a mix of Soviet and post-Soviet features, perhaps best characterized as "creeping corporatism". This paper looks in particular at the mighty Moscow construction industry complex and the ways it reterritorializes and rescales the city. Among topics considered are new frontiers of the construction industry's expansion, as well as civic responses to this corporatization of public space.

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[ Geography ] [ Research ] [ Dr. Sidorov ] [ Liberal Arts ] [ CSULB ]
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Last revised: 04/11/05
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