Skip to Local Navigation
Skip to Content
California State University, Long Beach
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics Banner
Print this pageAdd this page to your favoritesSelect a font sizeSelect a small fontSelect a medium fontSelect a large font
 

Highlights
December 2012: Volume 4, Issue 1

Dean's Message and Highlights

Dean Laura Kingsford

Dear Faculty and Staff,

Once again we are at the close of another semester. It still seems as though the calendar page just turned to September yesterday and we are welcoming faculty and students to another school year. Here it is December, classes have ended, and we are now counting days to the end of the semester and the start of the winter holidays.

With the passage of Proposition 30 in the November election, the CSU and public education at all levels in California have received the voters' approval and recognition of its importance. The Governor's January revise of the budget will indicate how our college and the campus will need to plan for the following year. Not only have voters given us a stamp of approval, but our prospective students do as well. CSULB has received over 80,000 applications for the 2013 fall semester.

With both voter approval of Proposition 30 and the high demand by students to attend CSULB, our mandate is clearly on student learning. In the STEM disciplines, our approach is targeted both at graduating students to enter the work force or advanced degree programs and graduating students to teach K-12 who are STEM-capable. Engaging student learning as a means of increasing student success requires rethinking classroom teaching. The CNSM Faculty Learning Community (FLC) is supporting instructors as they navigate the resources available to implement active learning in the classroom. This edition of the Highlights takes a look at the CNSM FLC as it finishes its first year.

As we all know, science and math learning is not limited to the classroom, and the CNSM Science Learning Center (SLC) is a place where informal science learning is actively promoted through hands-on exhibits. You will find out a little bit more about how the SLC has evolved over the years in the Staff Perspective from its director, Jim McKibben.

Infusing our research and the results of our research in our teaching forms the base from which many of us teach. Sabbatical leaves often give us the chance to deepen our research connection to our teaching. Bruno Pernet of Biological Sciences completed a year of sabbatical last year and shares his research in this edition.

Our students benefit from presenting the results of their research. Highlights of student presentations from this semester are also noted. Encourage your students to consider presenting their research data in the CSULB Student Research Competition in February. Our students' success in their classes and their research is due in no small part to the efforts being made across the college by both faculty and staff to engage students in learning. Please accept my thanks to all of you who work with the students and help them achieve their goals and successes. The excellence we achieve in this college is because of you.

Best wishes for a wonderful holiday.

Laura Kingsford signature

Laura Kingsford, Ph.D.
Dean, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
California State University, Long Beach

Back to top

Faculty Learning Community (FLC)

Lecture. Lab. Quiz. Test. Repeat as necessary. Administer Final Exam. Course over: Post grades. This familiar pattern found in the traditional STEM classes, is the time-honored standard by which instruction is delivered. Rooted in oral tradition, the lecture as a knowledge-delivery tool grew to primacy when books were not readily available, and the ability to read was not as common. Lecture, however, is only one of many in the set of teaching tools, and with the ever increasing array of technological developments making the foray into the lecture hall, invited and uninvited, the stand-alone lecture is a poorly performing competitor alongside the technological realm now engaging students. Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Kelly Young notes that CNSM faculty members care deeply about student learning and they put a lot of effort into preparing their classes. She understands how disheartening it is to deliver a fantastic lecture– a lecture where all the points are pulled together eloquently, effectively, and dynamically but despite this excellence, the expected learning experience did not happen for the students. What was the disconnect? She explained that it is experiences like this that bring faculty to the STEM Faculty Learning Community (FLC) in the CNSM.

Physics 310 - Active Learning in AS-244: Student writes on walls covered with whiteboard paint

Participation in the FLC starts the with the STEM FLC course hosted on-line on a secure site, developed by Young and Terre Allen, Director of the Faculty Professional Development Center. The course was first offered in the Fall of 2011, with a focus on how to better engage student learning. The course guides participants in their discovery of teaching strategies to be readily applied in their respective STEM classrooms. This course is not a general, one-size-fits-all approach to active learning methodologies. Rather, it asks participants to look at their specific courses and identify potential road blocks to student learning. By self-identifying their road blocks, participants are positioned to make their current on-going course their test site to apply what they are learning in the FLC. In addition, Young notes that although each STEM discipline has distinct and different topics of teaching, there are many commonalities across science and math. In addition, instructors in the CNSM major courses have the same students. Working together across the STEM spectrum, and finding out via the discussion boards how colleagues are teaching their same students in other classes brings added insight to understanding how CNSM students are learning.

The CNSM FLC enrolls 8-10 faculty members per semester and meets face-to-face only twice during the semester – once at the beginning and again at the end. The FLC secured on-line course gives participants access to a collated group of material geared to STEM, and practice in using "active learning techniques." Materials are presented in 5 different modules– "our students," "engaging students," "active learning," "assessment," and "work-life balance." Physics 310 - Active Learning in AS-244: Student-centered learning happens with discussion at tables with flatscreen problem presented by instructor at the document imager; ideas worked out by writing on the walls This course is structured around the gathering of evidence, beginning with identifying road blocks, and continuing through assessing student learning. Although test scores are a form of assessment, they are not the main focus of the assessment module of the course. Instead, the course focuses on using assessment as a continual gauge of student understanding during the semester. In addition, assessment can be used to inform future instructional choices both in the current offering of the course as well as subsequent offerings. Faculty participants are encouraged to consider evidence of student learning not only from a traditional summative perspective but formatively as well- much like they would consider any scientific data.

The FLC might be perceived as an added time-drain in the already timed-out schedule that most professors live by. This is one reason why the FLC now includes the work/life balance factor in their discussions. Young readily admits that learning and implementing new material, new ways of doing things takes time. She also cautions that students are often accustomed to the status quo of learning and may not always have an initial favorable reaction to changes in class procedures that invite them to become more active participants. Course evaluators and department chairs have been advised that the course evaluations in a changed course may experience an initial (and temporary) downward shift as instructors actively learn their way into new ways of teaching in their courses. However, as more faculty switch to engaged learning, student expectations of what a CNSM course should be like are changing.

As one of the lead facilitators of the FLC, a 2009 recipient of CSULB's Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, and an active researcher, Young is an enthusiastic advocate of the strategies of active learning. Biology 444/544 – Active Learning: Students break into small groups to work out menstrual cycle timeline Even as an undergraduate student at California Polytechnic University San Luis Obispo, she knew she wanted to both teach and conduct research. Like many of her colleagues in the sciences, she deeply appreciates that science is best learned hands-on and has long advocated for learning based on doing research. Despite enthusiastic responses to her teaching, she found herself concerned about what students were actually learning. She was dismayed to hear students approach science and math courses with attitudes of "science is hard," or "I hate math." Yes, she acknowledges, these subjects are challenging, but they are very worth learning, and hands on learning is the best method for really understanding STEM. As the FLC preface in the on-line course states, "science and math are not only crucial disciplines to make sense of the world around us, they are also fascinating (in fact, thrilling) subjects." The learning that students accomplish through research is highly interactive, and therefore highly effective. Young notes that the methods advanced in the FLC are an answer to the problem posed in this question: If students in lecture also interact with the material, would learning improve? By making predictions and involving students in groups, the traditional, inactive lecture is falling by the wayside, but learning is happening in increased amounts. Active student interaction with material in the lecture hall requires students and teachers to change their thinking about lecture. Students have become so accustomed to lecture that they may not feel like they are learning if the environment is changed. But, give it a chance. Engage. Engage yourself, engage your students. Engaged students who participate in hands-on learning become students who are critical thinkers. If you are interested, talk to your Chair and consider joining the FLC's exploration of Active and Engaged Learning.

Back to top

Faculty Research Spotlight

Bruno Pernet

Dr. Bruno Pernet, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences

Clues to Evolution and Ecosystems Through the Window of Invertebrate Development and Function

Ninety-five percent of all animal species living on earth are classified as "invertebrate". That is, they lack a backbone. From the human-centered perspective, it may be difficult to acknowledge that our group, the vertebrates, is a mere off-shoot of an invertebrate ancestor that was living in a world already filled with invertebrates derived from millions of years of prior evolution! Yet, we humans mostly ignore our unremarkable evolutionary position and devote much of our research attention solely on behalf of our own vertebrate group, and particularly ourselves. But what is missing in this approach is the vast majority of all animal diversity -represented by invertebrates- a virtual encyclopedia of animal evolution and biological systems from development to ecosystem function. Invertebrates inhabit virtually all of earth's environments and thereby demonstrate to us how animals can adapt to different environments, or environmental challenges. Invertebrates are critically important to the world's ecosystems, and understanding how they adapt to their particular environmental circumstances has become even more important in light of changing environmental conditions globally.

Invertebrate biologist Bruno Pernet, Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, conducts research aimed at understanding invertebrates' developmental patterns in the context of their evolution and their performance in the environment. For a number of years, Pernet's research has focused on understanding how evolutionary changes in egg yolk content lead to changes in larval development. He and his students explored the relationships between the extent of yolk storage (egg size) and subsequent developmental patterns of larvae of molluscs (e.g., shellfish) and annelids (e.g., marine worms). Different strategies are seen in nature. Some species produce greater numbers of eggs per parent. In these species, the eggs are smaller with less energetic investment (yolk) in each, but this requires that the larvae will need to develop into self-sufficient embryos quickly -they will need to develop food capturing and digestive organs at an earlier stage. In contrast, other species produce larger yolky eggs, and their larvae commonly lack feeding organs and rely solely upon stored yolk for their early development and growth.

Pernet is also interested in the structure and function ("functional morphology") of the diverse array of feeding mechanisms used by invertebrate larvae, and how this relates to the eventual success of the larvae in their environment. In light of the dangerous environs of the plankton where the larvae are developing, their successes in food capture, digestion efficiency, and growth are essential groundwork so that they can metamorphose and begin their next path toward adult life and reproductive efforts critical for perpetuation of the species.

In his recently completed sabbatical leave, Pernet spent three months working with two leading scientists at the Kewalo Marine Lab of the University of Hawaii, Drs. Elaine Seaver and Aldine Amiel. In their collaborative work, they employed an infrared laser technique to remove large yolky cells in early embryos of the marine polychaete, Capitalla teleata. This novel experimental approach reduced the "maternal investment" (i.e., amount of yolk), testing hypotheses about how reduced energy content in the embryos would affect developmental patterns in larvae and juveniles. While the experimental larvae and juveniles were significantly smaller, their development and eventual morphology were otherwise comparable to un-manipulated controls. The results demonstrated a lack of plasticity in the developmental patterns and indicated that degree of maternally derived energy principally impacts growth. The laser techniques and the experiment's results were published in the May 2012 issue of Invertebrate Biology. Pernet also spent some of his sabbatical at the Friday Harbor Laboratories of the University of Washington, where he described the development of a marine polychaete species that had previously not been understood. For the remainder of his sabbatical year, Pernet was back at CSULB to work on his newly funded National Science Foundation (NSF) project.

Pernet's research program has been supported through grants from the NSF and NOAA's Sea Grant Program, among other sources. In addition to his recently funded NSF grant to study feeding mechanisms of ciliated larvae, he has also been instrumental in bringing NSF support to improve the College's research infrastructure. In 2007, Pernet was the lead investigator, along with co-PIs Editte Gharakhanian, Diane Lee, and Michael Myers, of an NSF grant funding the creation of the Confocal Microscope Facility in the CNSM. This facility features an Olympus Fluoview 1000 confocal laser scanning microscope that allows CSULB scientists to use fluorescent probes to examine the structure of cells and tissues in high resolution (for more information, see Confocal website). Since its inception, many faculty and students (both undergraduate and graduate) from the CNSM and outside of the CNSM have taken advantage of this state-of-the-art facility. Currently, faculty from the departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Psychology have published at least nine scientific papers that included research done using the confocal facility, and more are in the works.

Although Pernet may have an understated demeanor if you see him in the halls of HSCI, beyond campus he is very well recognized by his professional colleagues internationally. As one indicator of this, since 2005 he has served on the editorial board of the journal Invertebrate Biology and, in 2010, he was elected as the Editor-in-Chief, a position continuing through 2016. He has also served (with fellow CSULB faculty Drs. Gwen Goodmanlowe and Chris Lowe) as a member of the secretariat of the Western Society of Naturalists from 2009-2011, and has provided continuing leadership and support to his principal professional society, the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. He has produced over 25 scholarly publications on his research, which since joining the faculty in 2004 has included many student authors. Back on campus, he was recognized in 2010 with a Faculty Award for Excellence by the College.

Pernet undertook his undergraduate studies at CSU Stanislaus and UC Santa Cruz where he received his Bachelor's degree in Biology with highest honors. He went on to the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories where he earned his Ph.D. in 1998. His postdoctoral experiences included stints at the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce in Florida, the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, and back at Friday Harbor Labs, prior to moving to Long Beach in 2004. In the Department of Biological Sciences, Dr. Pernet teaches Invertebrate Zoology (BIOL 313) and Evolution and Diversity (BIOL 211). In his free time, Dr. Pernet likes to read, swim, and hike. He also enjoys exercising his French penchant for fine cheeses, which of course must be partnered with an appropriate wine.

For more about Dr. Pernet's research, visit http://www.csulb.edu/~bpernet/index.htm

In the October 2012 issue of Nature, Pernet's image of an invertebrate bryozoan (shown below), was chosen by the Small World Photomicrography Competition (see Nature website; select 3rd image). The image (below) shows a colony of the encrusting bryozoan, Membranipora sp., which lives on kelps offshore in the Pacific Ocean. Working with Emeritus Professor Russell Zimmer at the University of Southern California, Pernet captured the moment when a row of live colony members extended their tentacles to feed. The image was manipulated in Photoshop using a "glowing edges" filter.

Membranipora sp.
Back to top

Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students 2012 (ABRCMS)

The 12th Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) was held in San Jose, California, November 7-10, 2012. It is the largest multidisciplinary student conference in the United States. The conference attracts approximately 3,300 individuals, including 1,700 undergraduate students, 400 graduate students and postdoctoral scientists and 1200 faculty, program directors and administrators. In addition to presenting their own original research, students attend specialized seminars on cutting edge research and professional development in the biomedical sciences.

Each year, the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics (CNSM) through the Jensen SAS Center, sends a group of students to attend the ABRCMS. This year, five CNSM student research programs, Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP), the Research Initiative for Science Enhancement (RISE), Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) HSI-STEM and Bridges to the Baccalaureate (Bridges) were represented with sixteen (16) students attending the conference in San Jose, CA. From CSULB, nine students presented their own original research projects, all were poster presentations. Ms. Kirsten Embretson was recognized with an award from the American Society for Microbiology for her presentation, Autographa california Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) Pathogenesis in Trichoplusia ni Larvae. These studies were performed under the supervision of Dr. Eric Haas-Stapleton (Biological Sciences).

Mariana Arellano presenting her poster at ABRCMS ABRCMS Banquet Hall at the San Jose Convention Center
Group of students at the Conference
(description follows)

CSULB participants at the 2012 ABRCRMS, (L-R back row): Associate Dean Dr. Henry Fung (CNSM), Lizzette Rojas (RISE),Christina Lopez (RISE), Nnejiuwa Ibe (MARC), Archie Turner (Bridges), Professor Marco Lopez (Chemistry & Biochemistry), Nicole Cooper (RISE), and Sophana Sak (LSAMP),

(L-R front): Assistant Professor Vasanthy Narayanaswami (Chemistry and Biochemistry – MARC Program Director), Mariana Arellano (Bridges), Timothy De La Cruz (RISE), and Jennifer Sanchez (Bridges).

Not Photographed: Professor Dr. Paul Buonora, Professor Balwant Khatra, Michael Tran, Pauline Blaimont, Kirsten Embretson, Ezekiel Gonzalez-Fernandez, Shanna Newton, Dago Ramos, Fiona Ruiz, and Lauren Fisher.

Back to top

Student Research Symposium

This year's CNSM Student Research Symposium on September 14, 2012 in the University Student Union Ballrooms drew 66 posters presented by 93 undergraduate and graduate students. The presenters were mostly CSULB undergraduate students who worked with faculty mentors during the past academic year and summer and community college students associated with summer research programs at CSULB from Cerritos, Cypress and Long Beach City College. CSULB graduate students presented the results of research expected to lead to their theses.

Undergraduate student research was funded by the following programs:

  • Bridges to the Baccalaureate (NIH)
  • Research Initiative for Science Enhancement (RISE)
  • Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
  • Arnold & Mabel Beckman Foundation
  • McNair Scholars Program
  • CSULB President's Scholars
  • Physical Science and Mathematics Scholarship (NSF)
  • U.S. Army Research Office
  • US Department of Agriculture
  • Tobacco Related Disease Research Program
  • CSUPERB Research Scholars
  • CSULB Women and Philanthropy
  • Orange County Water District
  • Tobacco Related Disease Research Program
  • HSI STEM Grant
  • Corporation for Science Advancement Grant
  • DoD Research and Educational Program

Approximately 269 attendees reviewed the research done by students with faculty mentors. Here is a list of the presentations, along with some photos of the presentations.

  1. Near-Field Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigations of CsHSO4.
    Jill Pestana1, Aron Varga2, and Abate Yohannes, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; and 2Department of Material Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125.
  2. Conservation of the Auxin Response Factor (ARF) MONOPTEROS (MP) Gene Lineage in Flowering Plants Conservation of the Auxin Response Factor (ARF) MONOPTEROS (MP) Gene Lineage in Flowering Plants.
    David J. Norris and Simon Malcomber, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  3. Near-field imaging of Graphene Plasmons Near-field imaging of Graphene Plasmons.
    Raul Torrico1, Terry Dunlap1, Victor Brar2, and Simon Malcomer, Ph.D.3
    1Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 2Atwater Research Group, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125; and 3Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  4. Real-Space Mapping of Nanoplasmonic Hotspots via Optical Antenna-Gap Loading Real-Space Mapping of Nanoplasmonic Hotspots via Optical Antenna-Gap Loading.
    Sarah Grefe, Daan Leiva, and Yohannes Abate, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  5. Numerical Simulation of Quark Hadron Transition in Neutron Star.
    Pak Too Chan and Prashanth Jaikumar, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  6. Infrared Plasmonic Proximity Effects and Polarization Dependence of Gold Triangle Nanostructures.
    Matt Acosta1, Sarah Grefe1, Jim Schuck2, and Yohannes Abate, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Physics and Astonomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, The Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, CA 94720.
  7. Application of Microwave Methods to the Synthesis and Alkylation of Aldehyde Derived Enamines Application of Microwave Methods to the Synthesis and Alkylation of Aldehyde Derived Enamines.
    Lizeth Perez and Paul T. Buonora, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  8. Bis-Phosphates as Inhibitors of Butyrylcholinesterase: Compounds with Potential for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease Bis-Phosphates as Inhibitors of Butyrylcholinesterase: Compounds with Potential for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.
    Dung N.P. Vo, Silvia A. Cervantes, Adriel Fernandez, Kim Ngan Tu, Astor Surino, Trina Tran, Kensaku Nakayama, Ph.D., and Roger Acey, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840.
  9. Structural Analysis of Human Apolipoprotein E3 N-terminal and C-terminal Domains by Mass Spectrometry and Fluorescence Spectroscopy.
    Roy Hernandez1, Pankaj Dwivedi1, Arti Patel1, Wendy Beck1, Sasidhar Nirudodhi2, Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D., and Claudia Maier, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.
  10. Synthesis of Enantiopure Aminopolyols Synthesis of Enantiopure Aminopolyols.
    Makan Kaviani Joupari and Michael Schramm, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  11. Characterizing the Binding of Enzyme Inhibitors at the Molecular and Ensemble Levels Characterizing the Binding of Enzyme Inhibitors at the Molecular and Ensemble Levels.
    Samantha Cao1, Benjamin Pham1, Amethyst Radcliffe2, Phuc La1, Richard Wang3, Yi An4 and Eric Sorin, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 2Department of Physics and Astronomy; California State Univeristy, Long Beach, CA 90840; 3Department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science, California State University Long Beach, CA; and 4Department of Chemistry, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX.
  12. Investigating the Folding Dynamics of the RNA Pseudoknot Structural Motif via Massively Parallel Molecular Dynamics Investigating the Folding Dynamics of the RNA Pseudoknot Structural Motif via Massively Parallel Molecular Dynamics.
    Benjamin Pham1, Amethyst Radcliffe2, Phuc La1, Mona Bakhom1, Samantha Cao1, and Eric Sorin, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  13. Expression, Isolation and Purification of Recombinant Human Apolipoprotein E.
    Patricia Nguyen and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  14. Monitoring Post-Restoration Shifts in Microbial Communities in a Southern 
	 California Salt Marsh Monitoring Post-Restoration Shifts in Microbial Communities in a Southern California Salt Marsh.
    Mariana Arellano1, Nathan McLain2, and Jesse Dillon, Ph.D.2
    1Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  15. Human ApoA-I Lysine Residues Promote Association with Lipopolysaccharides and Phosphatidylglycerol Bilayers.
    Wendy Beck1, Ivan Biglang-awa1, Chris Adams1, Heather Vincent2, Eric Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.2, and Paul Weers, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  16. Proteomics Analysis of Oxidative Stress Modification of Apolipoprotein E by Acrolein.
    Tuyen Tran1, Yuan Yu Lee2, Koji Uchida3, and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.1,4
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 2Center for Education in Proteomics Analysis, IIRMES, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 3Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan; and 4Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609.
  17. Cultivation of Heterotrophic Marine Bacteria Along the Pacific Coast of North America Cultivation of Heterotrophic Marine Bacteria Along the Pacific Coast of North America.
    Maria Ortiz, Erin Schaadt, Lizzette Rojas, and Jesse Dillon, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  18. Magnetization Creep in Iron Phthalocyanine Thin Films Magnetization Creep in Iron Phthalocyanine Thin Films.
    Daniel Javier, Mathew Werber, Matthew Byrne, and Thomas Gredig, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  19. Determination of the Cytosine Methylation Status of Arabidopsis thaliana Genes Using Bisulfite Treatment.
    Kevin To, Sabrina Ramos, and Judy Brusslan, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  20. Control of Hysteresis in Iron (II) Phthalocyanine Thin Films Control of Hysteresis in Iron (II) Phthalocyanine Thin Films.
    Mather Werber, Matthew Byrne, Daniel Javier, and Thomas Gredig, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  21. Removal of Antibiotics from Water Using the Advanced Oxidation/Reduction Process  
	 with Sulfate Radicals Removal of Antibiotics from Water Using the Advanced Oxidation/Reduction Process with Sulfate Radicals.
    DeeAnn K. Asamoto and Stephen P. Mezyk, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  22. Speech Volume Meter for Disabled Student Services at California State University Long Beach Speech Volume Meter for Disabled Student Services at California State University Long Beach.
    Melynda Jaramillo, Maria Kathleen Rodriguez, Wendy Rivera Chavez, and Chuhee Kwon, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astonomy, California State University, Long Beach. CA 90840.
  23. Chemical Transport via Biological Unilamellar Membrane Chemical Transport via Biological Unilamellar Membrane.
    Ayu Fujii and Michael P. Schramm, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  24. Brain Evolution and Heat Stress: A Test of Two Hypotheses Brain Evolution and Heat Stress: A Test of Two Hypotheses.
    Marcell Cadney and Ashley Carter, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  25. Impacts of Invasive Tamarix and its Hybrids on Infauna at San Dieguito Lagoon Impacts of Invasive Tamarix and its Hybrids on Infauna at San Dieguito Lagoon.
    Anita Arenas, Tania Asef and Christine Whitcraft, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University.
  26. Magento Optical Kerr Effect Measurement of Magnetic Thin-Films on Self-Assembled 
	 Nanospheres Magento Optical Kerr Effect Measurement of Magnetic Thin-Films on Self-Assembled Nanospheres.
    Brian Flores, Russell Gleason, and Jiyeong Gu, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  27. Detection of Acetylcholine with Ion-selective Electrodes Based on Cavitands.
    Nicole Mangabat1, Jeanice Rodriguez2, and Michael Schramm, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Chemical Engineering, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  28. Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Film Morphology Impact on Impedance Spectrum Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Film Morphology Impact on Impedance Spectrum.
    Kyle Robinson and Thomas Gredig, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  29. Estradiol Dose Dependently Downregulates Estrogen Receptor-a in the Mediobasal Hypothalamus, but not in the Amygdala.
    Maribel Maciel, Matthew Mahavongtrakul, Martha Garcia, and Kevin Sinchak, Ph.D.
  30. Investigation of the Dark Reaction between Hydrogen Peroxide and Chloramines Investigation of the Dark Reaction between Hydrogen Peroxide and Chloramines.
    Matthew Chagnon, Garrett McKay, Brittney L Sjelin, and Stephen P Mezyk, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  31. Pore Space Engineering and Functionalization in Metal-Organic Framework Materials Pore Space Engineering and Functionalization in Metal-Organic Framework Materials.
    Addis Fuhr, Shou-Tian Zheng, and Xianhui Bu, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  32. Field Evidence of Predator-Induced Phenotypic Plasticity in the Marine Snail 
	 Nucella lamellosa Field Evidence of Predator-Induced Phenotypic Plasticity in the Marine Snail Nucella lamellosa.
    Sophana Sak, and Bengt Allen, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  33. Inbreeding Affects Mate Choice in Female Drosphila.
    Shanna Newton, Amberle McKee, and Ashley Carter, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  34. Triserine Lactone Receptors for Anion Recognition Triserine Lactone Receptors for Anion Recognition.
    Christina Lopez, Christopher Walowski, Ryan Kemp, and Eric Marinez, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  35. Electron Tunneling Titrations in Macroscopic Hg-Hg Junctions.
    Jordan Garside; Katelyn Nelson; Chari Martinez; Aaron Barnum; Ngan Le; Kate Monahan; David Roeuth, B.S; and Kris Slowinski, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA.
  36. Optimization of Organic Solar Cell Performance with Grain Size Optimization of Organic Solar Cell Performance with Grain Size.
    Eric Muckley and Thomas Gredig, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  37. Subpopulations of μ-Opioid Receptor Neurons in the Medial Preoptic Nucleus  
	 Express Estrogen Receptor-α and Opioid Receptor-like Receptor-1 Subpopulations of μ-Opioid Receptor Neurons in the Medial Preoptic Nucleus Express Estrogen Receptor-α and Opioid Receptor-like Receptor-1.
    George Polovin, Veronica Thach, Priscilla Tea, Heang Seng, Robyn Bowlby, and Kevin Sinchak, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  38. In Estradiol Primed Rats Subsequent Free Estradiol Rapidly Facilitates Lordosis     
	 through G-Protein Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) In Estradiol Primed Rats Subsequent Free Estradiol Rapidly Facilitates Lordosis through G-Protein Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30).
    Nathan Long, Sam Chhorvann, and Kevin Sinchak, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  39. Putative Latency of Autographa californica M Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in 
	 Anticarsia gemmatalis larvae Putative Latency of Autographa californica M Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in Anticarsia gemmatalis larvae.
    Evan P. McMenamy and Eric J. Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  40. The Effect of H3K4me3 demethylases, At1g30810 and At5g46910, on Senescence Up- regulated Genes (SURGs) and Senescence Down-regulated Genes (SDRGs) in Arabidopsis thaliana.
    Alex Plong and Judy Brusslan, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  41. ApoE Nanovehicle: A Potential Transporter of Resveratrol to Target Sites.
    Sea Kim and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  42. Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Kdm6a Gene in the Mouse Cortex and   
	 Hippocampus during Early Development Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Kdm6a Gene in the Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus during Early Development.
    Debbie Moreira1, Courtney Donovan2, Khary Filer3, and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.2
    1Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650; 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; and 3Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808.
  43. Magneto Optical Kerr Effect Measurement of Double Exchange Spring System Magneto Optical Kerr Effect Measurement of Double Exchange Spring System.
    Hanming Yuan and Jiyeong Gu, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  44. Determination of the Molecular Mass and Self-Associate State of Recombinant Rat  
	 ApoE Determination of the Molecular Mass and Self-Associate State of Recombinant Rat ApoE.
    Jessica Kyees, Tuyen Tran, and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  45. Circadian Rhythm and Perturbation of MIPS in D. melanogaster Circadian Rhythm and Perturbation of MIPS in D. melanogaster.
    Jennifer Huynh, Rachel Windsor, Monica Toscano, Elizabeth Eldon, Ph.D. and Lisa Klig, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  46. Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Splicing Factors in the Developing Mouse Cortex    
	 and Hippocampus Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Splicing Factors in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus.
    Kathy Trang1, Oliva Jimenez2,3, Courtney Donovan3, and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Biological Sciences and Psychology, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032; 2Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650; and 3Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  47. An Examination of Heterosis or Outbreeding Depression in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans An Examination of Heterosis or Outbreeding Depression in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.
    Kriska Parda and Ashley Carter, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  48. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) Pathogenesis in Trichoplusia ni Larvae Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) Pathogenesis in Trichoplusia ni Larvae.
    Kirsten Embretson, Julie Lang, Chelsea Smith, Tiffany Chu, and Eric Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  49. Odd-Frequency Triplet Josephson Current Through an Exchange Spring Odd-Frequency Triplet Josephson Current Through an Exchange Spring.
    Adam Moke, Thomas Baker, Adam Richie-Halford, and Andreas Bill, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  50. Identification of Novel Sexually Dimorphic Genes in the Developing Mouse Cortex  
	 and Hippocampus Identification of Novel Sexually Dimorphic Genes in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus.
    Chris Armoskus and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  51. Li3Mg2OsO6, a Geometrically Frustrated Novel Transition Metal Oxide Li3Mg2OsO6, a Geometrically Frustrated Novel Transition Metal Oxide.
    Phuong-Hieu Nguyen1, Farshid Ramezanipour2, John Greedan2, and Shahab Derakhshan, Ph.D.
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research and Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4M1.
  52. High Temperature Magnetic Properties of Pyrochlore Compound Y2FeTaO7 and Synthesis of its Nb-Doped Variants: Y2FeNbxTa1-xO7 (0= x =0.5).
    Malinda Tan1, Phuong-Hieu Nguyen1, Jiyeong Gu, Ph.D.2, and Shahab Derakhshan, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  53. Investigating the Kinetics of the Hydroxyl Radical Reaction with Lanthanide  
	 Complexed-DTPA Investigating the Kinetics of the Hydroxyl Radical Reaction with Lanthanide Complexed-DTPA.
    Thomas Cullen1, Leigh Martin2, Bruce Mincher2, and Stephen Mezyk, Ph.D.1,
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho.
  54. Computer-based Analysis Applications in Particle Physics DiscoveryComputer-based Analysis Applications in Particle Physics Discovery.
    Richard Patrick, Prashanth Jaikumar, Ph.D., and Shahriar Abachi, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA. 90840.
  55. Temperature Dependence of the Reaction between the Hydroxyl Radical and Organic Matter.
    Garrett McKay1, Jonathan Kleinman1, Mei Dong2, Fernando Rosario-Ortiz2, and Stephen Mezyk, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Environmental Engineering,University of Colorado, Boulder, CO. 80309.
  56. Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Srsf10 in the Developing Mouse Hippocampus and 
	   Cortex Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Srsf10 in the Developing Mouse Hippocampus and Cortex.
    Lauren Fisher1, Kathy Trang2, and, Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D1.
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach; CA 90840 and Department of Biological Sciences and Psychology. California State University, Los Angeles, CA. 90032.
  57. Degradation of Iodinated Carboxylic Acid Compounds in WaterDegradation of Iodinated Carboxylic Acid Compounds in Water.
    Lauren Olson1, Kimberly Rickman1, Steven Smith1, Jay LaVerne2, Michael Schramm, Ph.D1. and Stephen Mezyk, Ph.D,1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach; CA 90840 and 2Radiation Laboratory and Department of Physics, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556.
  58. Evaluation of the Hydroxyl Radical Based Degradation Efficiency for Antibiotics in Water.
    Shauna Otto, Stephen Mezyk, Ph.D., and Roger Acey, Ph.D.,
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  59. Establishing an Electron Pulse Radiolysis Standard: ABTS Radical Kinetics Establishing an Electron Pulse Radiolysis Standard: ABTS Radical Kinetics.
    Brittney Sjelin and Stephen Mezyk, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  60. Self-Assembly of Collagen Peptides into Hollow Microtubules.
    Armando Reimer and Katarzyna Slowinska, Ph.D,
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  61. Towards Fully Organic Functional Mesoporous Materials Towards Fully Organic Functional Mesoporous Materials.
    Angelica P. Sapitan; Melody Loera; Michael P. Schramm, Ph.D.; and Katarzyna Slowinska, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  62. Comparison of Inositol Catabolism in Various Drosophilids Comparison of Inositol Catabolism in Various Drosophilids.
    Eliseo Villarreal, Matthew Smith, Melissa Jones, Lisa Klig, Ph.D., and Elizabeth Eldon, Ph.D.,
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach; CA 90840.
  63. Making Salivary Glands in Drosophila Embryos: Identifying Genes that Interact with  
	 the Toll-like Receptor, 18-Wheeler Making Salivary Glands in Drosophila Embryos: Identifying Genes that Interact with the Toll-like Receptor, 18-Wheeler.
    Timothy Delacruz, Angela Neyra-Phu, and Elizabeth Eldon, Ph.D,
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach; CA 90840.
  64. Electronic Emission Spectroscopy of Gallium Carbide Electronic Emission Spectroscopy of Gallium Carbide.
    Jolly Dinh, Daniel Johnson, Kristy Nguyen, Nancy Nguyen, Charita Suphavarahasoonthorn, Allyson York, and Chris Brazier, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  65. Peptide Nanorod: A Novel Drug Carrier Peptide Nanorod: A Novel Drug Carrier.
    Aparna Shinde and Katarzyna Slowinska, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach;, CA 90840.
  66. Effects of Tetra-Alkyl Bis-Phosphates on Cholinesterases.
    Archie D. Turner, Joshua J. Feng, Kim Tu, Kensaku Nakayama, Ph.D. and Roger A. Acey, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
Back to top

Highlighting New Faces

Michael Peterson

Michael Peterson

Assistant Professor
Department of Physics and Astronomy

Michael Peterson, Ph.D., was recruited as an Assistant Professor to the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Fall 2011 to fill a computational theoretical opening in the department. He majored in both math and physics at the University of Utah where he graduated with a B.Sc. in Mathematics and a B.Sc. in Physics. From there, he went to Pennsylvania State University where he earned his Ph.D. in physics. He then was appointed as a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Santa Cruz, followed by a postdoctoral research associate appointment in the Condensed Matter Theory Center in the Department of Physics at the University of Maryland College Park. Mike's research interests are the fractional quantum Hall effect, topological quantum phases, quantum phases of ultra-cold atom gases, composite fermion theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect, strongly correlated lattice models, and thermolectric propertiers of strongly correlated materials. He uses a variety of methods most of which are computationally heavy numerical methods (using high performance computer clusters). These methods are often necessary to make any theoretical progress due to the fact that most approximations are simply not applicable.

Mike is originally from southern California near Oxnard, and is enjoying becoming acquainted with the Long Beach area with his wife, Priti, and their two boys: Ishaan who just turned 3, and Vivek who is just over 3 months old. Michael Peterson and son Ishaan He spends pretty much all of his non-work time with the family. He finds that life has become pretty hectic with the new baby, but he says that he and his wife enjoy taking the kids to the Aquarium of the Pacific here in Long Beach to take a look at all the different fish and animals. Ishaan especially likes to search for Nemo and Dori. His parents live "nearby" in Oxnard and so the kids are able to spend quite a bit of time with their grandparents around the beach and partaking in various water related activities. In the spare time he does have, he likes to run for exercise, often with Ishaan in the trailer and they stop off at the park to play. Someday he hopes to have time again to read books, go to movies, attend concerts (especially live jazz), but the ages of his children have put most of that temporarily on hold.

Mike enjoys traveling internationally as well and his wife's extended family is almost entirely in India so they travel there from time to time. He is also beginning to explore the greater LA area (and down to San Diego) a little bit more. Recently, they went to Griffith Observatory and had a great time. They look forward to discovering what else southern California has to offer. Lastly, Mike says that he really loves how the weather in Long Beach is almost always sunny, warm, and perfect!

Back to top

Staff Perspectives

Jim McKibben

Jim McKibben
Director, Science Learning Center and
Coordinator, CNSM Shop

Looking for Jim? Jim McKibben, the Science Learning Center (SLC) Director and Shop Coordinator? If you are, try room 110 in the Hall of Science, just off the main entrance hall. You may find him there tinkering with exhibits or explaining Lightning in a Bottle to a group of visitors. If he's not there, you might find him tinkering with something in the CNSM Shop.

Jim's alternate job title could be "Tinkerer." He has tinkered with stuff to make it work since his boyhood visits to the city dump and salvage yard to find old parts and fix them to make them work. At one point, he had 11 old televisions in his bedroom, and he was able to get 9 of them working. Today, tinkering with old TVs has been replaced by tinkering with science exhibits in the SLC or in a science lab fixing or building needed lab equipment for faculty along with the two science shop technicians, Jeffrey Cox and Kevin Bullock.

Jim spent his growing up years not only scrounging through junk yards, building Jacob's ladders, and rebuilding televisions, but also making weekly forays through the Los Angeles Natural History Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry from the age of 10 when he and a cousin were dropped off at Exposition Park while their dads would usher events at the nearby Coliseum. He never tired of visits to the museums. He was always fascinated by what he could learn new each visit and came to regard the museums as his own personal learning space. After high school, he started his college career in majoring in Electronics Engineering at Cal Poly Pomona. Despite spending his boyhood completing a myriad of electrical circuits, he realized that electronics engineering was not the career path for him, and he transferred to CSULB in 1970 to study marine biology where he studied and researched sharks with Biology professor Donald Nelson, Ph.D., a leader in shark research. Following his Bachelor's degree, Jim spent nearly an entire year in Tahiti working with Nelson. At the end of the year, Nelson asked him to join his research lab as a graduate student. Jim's skills in electronics and tinkering were well applied in the lab because the Nelson lab pioneered the use of ultrasonic techniques in studying the movement patterns and home ranges of sharks. After his studies with Nelson, Jim applied his electronics background again, this time as a part-time technician in the Physics department. From there, he moved into a full-time machinist position in the CNSM Shops in 1983.

While Jim was transitioning from shark research to the science shop, the CNSM Natural Sciences Museum opened in the basement of Peterson Hall 2 (PH2), room 008, in 1979 featuring a moon rock display, and Henrietta, a 15 foot, 8 inch Burmese python. Along with the development of the museum in PH2, interest and support for science learning outreach from Dean Roger Bauer and President Stephen Horn resulted in the conversion of a 27-foot RV into the Mobile Science Museum (MSM) in 1980. Area schools benefited from the visits of the mobile science laboratory with hands-on, interactive displays to foster enthusiasm for learning science in local students. In 1991, with the support of Dean Jensen, Jim became the director of the museum, and his life-long loves of learning science and tinkering were united as he began transitioning the museum's static demonstration displays to hands-on exhibits that immersed the participants into doing science as opposed to observing it. In a move to have a name that fit the evolving scope of the museum, the CNSM Natural Science Museum became the Science Learning Center. With feedback from Dr. Ayer's visits during the early 1980s to the groundbreaking San Francisco Science Exploratorium interactive science displays, as well as his own knowledge of hands-on science learning, Jim built and modified science displays that invited learning by doing. The newly named center relocated across the hall to PH2-010, a larger, multi-exit room that had a good electrical supply since it had previously been the old machine shop. Located off the beaten track of most university visitors in the basement of PH2, chance visitors often felt as though they had stumbled upon a secret cache of science learning.

These days, the SLC can no longer claim to be the best kept secret on campus. Science Learning Center Now located in the Hall of Science just off the main foyer on the new first floor, the SLC has its door open for business whenever Jim or one of his volunteers is available. The SLC now draws daily drop-in visitors who take a peek, and then stay a while as they look, touch, and do science in the SLC's new home. The crown jewel of the center, a large 700 gallon bamboo-encased salt water aquarium visible from the doorway, is the attribute that draws people through the doorway and begins their interaction with science. The SLC appeals broadly across campus. It is integrated regularly into campus tours, as an on-campus field trip for numerous summer camps, featured as one the campus gems by the President, and even serves as a regular part of the curriculum in the American Language Institute (ALI) classes. During visits to the SCL with the their English language learning students, ALI Teachers find that English conversation happens more readily when their students experience the SLC exhibits. The steady stream of visitors includes both international and U.S. educators seeking to implement interactive science learning in their home schools and districts. Mobile Science Museum William Ritz, emeritus professor in Science Education and innovator in early childhood science education internationally brings collaborators from China and other Asian countries into the SLC and the MSM so educators can experience what is possible in hands-on science learning. Educators from Cambodia returned home with ideas that transformed a 10-ton truck into a mobile science classroom that takes week-long science lessons to children in rural villages. The SLC also has become a featured component in local homeschooling curriculum groups' field trips.

The diversity of groups visiting the SLC and the MSM and returning for repeat visits is indicative of the appeal of interactive, hands-on science learning regardless of age or background. The SLC and the MSM in Action While faculty members across the college are integrating more active learning into their classroom lectures to increase student engagement, the SLC and the MSM continue to model of informal interactive learning. Jim tells the story of four educators visiting from South Philadelphia who had plans for a double decker bus full of static displays that would inform viewers of the accomplishments of black scientists. After seeing the MSM, they changed to interactive displays in a regular converted bus, and had great success engaging students in learning about the contributions to science by black scientists. The SLC and MSM interactive displays help reduce the intimidation many students have about learning science. Jim tells of one student who was very resistant to anything science. Jim asked the student what he was interested in. The student replied: "Baseball." That was all Jim needed to introduce the student to Physics. When he demonstrated how Bernoulli's principle explains how a curve ball works, the student became engaged and interested in physics. The new location of the SLC in HSCI-110, on a hallway with lots of student traffic, provides opportunities for student learning connections to happen whenever its door is open, and Jim hopes to keep it open often. He believes that personal interaction is a stimulant that motivates learning.

Back to top

Save These Dates!

  • Friday, February 1, 2013
    Due: Abstracts for 5th Annual Faculty Research Symposium
    Registration & Summary for CSULB Annual Student Research Competition
  • Friday, February 22, 2013
    CSULB Annual Student Research Competition
  • Friday, March 1, 2013
    CNSM 5th Annual Faculty Research Symposium
  • Thursday, March 14, 2013
    Fellows Colloquium – Cosmic Yin-Yang: The Bright and Dark Sides of Our Universe with Prashanth Jaikumar, Physics and Astronomy
  • Saturday, March 23, 2013
    Math Day at the Beach
  • Wednesday, April 17, 2013
    35th Nobel Laureate Lecture – Dr. John Mather, 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics
  • Friday, May 24, 2013
    CNSM 64th Annual Commencement at 1:00 p.m.
Back to top