Skip to Local Navigation
Skip to Content
California State University, Long Beach
College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics Banner
Print this pageAdd this page to your favoritesSelect a font sizeSelect a small fontSelect a medium fontSelect a large font
 

Highlights
December 2011: Volume 3, Issue 1

Dean's Message and Highlights

Dean Laura Kingsford

Dear Faculty and Staff,

This Fall has seen the achievement of a long worked for goal: the completion of the Hall of Science and celebrating that at the Dedication and Open House on September 23. Over the past few months, I have had so many people tell me how wonderful this building is not only for the college, but for the whole campus and community. It's something we all share with pride.

It is already the end of the Fall semester, and it is hard to believe that we are already halfway through the academic year. Faculty and staff worked hard to make the transition to the new building and be ready for classes. The results of their hard work are evident wherever I go in the college as I see faculty and students fully engaged in learning. This edition of Highlights will try to capture a few of these engagements.

In addition, a link to a photo essay commemorating the Dedication and Open House is included in this edition. As you will see, we also have some wonderful centers in the college including our Jensen SAS Center and the new Academic Advising Center. If you haven't visited them, drop by HSCI-164 to find out what's happening and get to know the staff. They do an amazing job of supporting our students and providing enriching opportunities for them. The move for the Marine Biology Laboratory has been one of the most complicated, but they are finally at the point where they can start collecting specimens and plan to host another open house in the spring.

And finally, to cap off the semester, our students rose to the challenge of a friendly competition between the Graduate Biology Student Society and the Marine Biology Student Association by bringing in over 700 non-perishable food items to see Biological Sciences Assistant Professor Ashley Carter wear a holiday sweater designed by a biology student and her husband for the week of finals.

We thank all our staff members for what they do daily to provide the support for our students and faculty.

Best wishes for a wonderful holiday.

Laura Kingsford signature

Laura Kingsford, Ph.D.
Dean College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
California State University, Long Beach

Back to top

Food Drive Competition

A friendly competition in the Department of Biological Sciences netted over 700 non-perishable food items for the Holiday Food Drive co-sponsored by the Graduate Student Biology Society (GSBS) and the Marine Biology Student Association (MBSA). The student groups amped up the incentive for contributions by getting faculty advisors to agree to wear a holiday sweater specially designed by Lisa Fitzgerald-DeHoog and her husband during finals week if their students brought in the most canned goods. Assistant Professor Ashley Carter's students responded most enthusiastically, contributing 362 non-perishable food items to get their professor, Ashley Carter, the grand prize of sweater-wearer!

Packing up the contributions Assistant Professor Ashley Carter wearing the grand prize sweater. It lights up! Counting the food contributions
Back to top

Development

CNSM Alumni and Emeriti continue generous gifting to the College

Math emeriti Barbara Turner and Ken Warner have made a generous gift to endow an annual Award in Mathematics. The purpose of the Turner-Warner Award is to reward the academic performance and mathematical promise of a senior or graduate student in pure mathematics. The Turner-Warner Award is the Department of Mathematics & Statistics' third endowed fund in the last five years. It joins the Dan Martinez Scholarship Endowment and the G2 Software Systems Scholarship Endowment, both of which were funded by alumni of the Department.

Back to top

The Jensen Student Access to Science Center and the CNSM Academic Advising Center

The James L. Jensen Student Access to Science and Mathematics (SAS) Center has adjusted well to its new space in HSCI-164. The move to the new building brought a number of changes to the SAS Center, notably, the reconfiguring of the computer lab as the G2 Computer Lab to provide Science and Math students with an open access computer lab suited to their specific academic needs. The other major change has been the creation of the CNSM Academic Advising Center to provide academic advising to CNSM majors. The Academic Advising Center is located right around the corner from the SAS Center in HSCI-167.

Peer Mentor and Tutoring in the Jensen SAS Center

The SAS Center's relocation to HSCI has increased students' connection to academic support services since many CNSM majors are attending class in the Hall of Science building. Faculty and staff are invited to drop by and check out the new location! The SAS Center continues to offer specialized advising for students intending to pursue careers in the health professions, assist applicants in applying to professional and graduate schools, and provide peer mentoring and tutoring. In addition, the SAS Center makes available opportunities for students to either conduct research with CNSM faculty or learn about teaching at the K-12 level through federally funded grant programs. (Some of the research results are posted below in the CNSM Student Research Symposium.)

The CNSM Advising Center works collaboratively with the SAS Center and faculty advisors to proactively meet the advising needs of students while providing appropriate interventions and support services. Freshmen and transfer students required to attend Mandatory Advising will be contacted by CNSM Advisors Angela Tuan and Tim Kalliomaa in the new Advising Center. Advisors are available to:

  • Provide information about academic programs and resources
  • Assist with course selection and sequencing
  • Assist in developing short-term and long-term goals
  • Help navigate academic requirements, policies, and procedures
  • Provide appropriate interventions and career planning.

The SAS Center and the new CNSM Advising Center share a joint mission: the success of CNSM students in their academic careers. Both Centers will work closely with students through their respective services.

Back to top

Research Spotlights

Faculty and Students Present at American Chemical Society National Meeting

Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty, postdoctoral associates, graduate students, and undergraduate students co-authored 18 papers presented at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Denver, Colorado August 28-September 1, 2011.

  • Associate Professor Christopher Brazier was one of the authors of "Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the allyl radical via the E21xB(3p) electronically excited state," with Yu Song, Michael Lucas, and Jingsong Zhang of the Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, Riverside.
  • Professor Lijuan Li and post-doctoral researcher Rongming Wang were coauthors of "Photochemical nitric oxide delivery from iron sulfur nitrosyl clusters" with John Valadez Garcia, Peter C Ford, Galen D Stucky of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, and Fan Zhang of the Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai China.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and graduate students Garrett McKay and Jonathan Kleinman coauthored "Temperature dependence of the reaction between hydroxyl radicals and organic matter," with Mei M. Dong and Fernando L. Rosario-Ortiz of the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado .
  • Professor Xianhui Bu and post-doctoral researcher Shou-Tian Zheng were authors of "Control of pore space in metal-organic frameworks for enhanced gas sorption" with Pingyun Feng and Tao Wu of the Department of Chemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and Spring 2011 alumna Kimberly Rickman were authors on "Removal of nitrosamines from water using sulfate radicals" with James J Kiddle of the Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
  • Associate Professor Eric Marinez was an author on "Ketonic Strecker reaction: Nafion-Fe, an efficient Lewis acid catalyst" with G. K. Surya Prakash, Inessa Bychinskaya, Thomas Mathew, and George A. Olah of the Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and Spring 2011 alumna Kimberly Rickman were coauthors on "Oxidation reaction kinetics, efficiencies, and major products of the hydroxyl radical based degradation of artificial sweeteners" with Janie E. Toth, James J. Kiddle, and Andre Venter at the Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and Spring 2011 alumna Kimberly Rickman were coauthors on "Interaction of pharmaceutical compounds with dissolved organic matter (DOM)" with Carlen N. Smith, and James J. Kiddle of Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
  • Matt Chagnon at the ACS Meeting in Denver Professors Roger Acey and Kensaku Nakayaman and graduate student Kim Ngan Tu and undergraduate students Carmen Castillo, Omar Gallegos, Reyna Raya, and Elise Van Fossen were coauthors on "Tetra-alkyl bis-phosphates as bivalent inhibitors of butyrylcholinesterase: Compounds with potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease."
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and graduate student Hanqing Pan coauthored "Radical reactions with terpenes in the atmosphere."
  • Professor Paul Buonora and undergraduate student Kevin Mahle coauthored "Dynamic kinetic resolution in the cyclocondensative synthesis of b-alkyl-5,5-bicyclic lactams."
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and undergraduate student Matt Chagnon coauthored "Temperature dependence of the dark reaction between chloramines and hydrogen peroxide."
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and graduate student Anas Al-Qazzaz coauthored "Kinetic study of the radiolytic degradation of phthalates in aqueous solution."
  • Thomas Cullen at the ACS Meeting in Denver Professor Stephen Mezyk, graduate student Thomas Cullen, and Spring 2011 alumna Delora Gaskins were coathors on "Investigation into the radiolytic stability of lanthanide-complexed extraction ligands" with Leigh R Martin and Bruce J Mincher of the Department of Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk authored "Removing chemical contaminants from water: Kinetics of AOP radical reactions."
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk coauthored "Advanced oxidation using radiolysis to understand the remediation of organic contaminant mixtures in secondary treated wastewater" with Julie Peller, of the Department of Chemistry, Indiana University Northwest, Gary, Indiana.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk and Spring 2011 alumna Kimberly Rickman were coauthors on "Kinetics and pathways of the destruction of b-lactam antibiotics by hydroxyl radicals" with Xuexiang He and Dionysios D Dionysiou of the Environmental Engineering and Science Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, and Armah A de la Cruz of the National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • Professor Stephen Mezyk coauthored "Analytical techniques to detect and quantify CMPO and its radiolysis products" with Gracy Elias, Gary S Groenewold, and Bruce J Mincher of the Department of Chemistry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, Idaho.
Back to top

CNSM Student Research Symposium

This year's CNSM Student Research Symposium on September 16, 2011 in the University Student Union Ballrooms drew a record number of 73 posters presented by 86 undergraduate and graduate students. The presenters were mostly CSULB undergraduate students who worked with faculty mentors during the past academic year and summer and community college students associated with summer research programs at CSULB from Cerritos, Cypress and Long Beach City College. CSULB graduate students presented the results of research expected to lead to their theses.

Undergraduate student research was funded by the following programs: Bridges to the Baccalaureate (NIH), Research Initiative for Science Enhancement (RISE), Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP), Arnold & Mabel Beckman Foundation, McNair Scholars Program, CSULB President's Scholars, and the Physical Science and Mathematics Scholarship (NSF).

Approximately 250 attendees reviewed the research done by students with faculty mentors. Here is a list of the presentations, along with some photos of the presentations.

  1. Poster: A Hybrid Stiff Solver for the Rayleigh-Plesset Equation A Hybrid Stiff Solver for the Rayleigh-Plesset Equation.
    Mutaz Alsayegh1, Chung-Min Lee1, Ph.D., Pradad Perlekar2, Federico Toschi2
    1Department of Mathematics and Statistics, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Applied Physics, Technische Universiteit Einvodhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
  2. Specific Analysis Method Improves Data Analysis for Illumina Microarrays.
    Chris Armoskus and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  3. Characterization of Lignocellulose-degrading Fungi in a Southern CA Salt Marsh.
    Araceli Beltran, Lindsay Darjany, and Jesse Dillon, Ph.D.Araceli Beltran and Jesse Dillon, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  4. Role of Positively Charged Residues in Human Apolipoprotein A-I Antimicrobial Activity.
    Ivan M. Biglang-awa, Wendy H. J. Beck, and Paul M.M. Weers, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  5. Poster: Characterization of Prokaryotes in a Saline Spring near the Salton Sea, California Characterization of Prokaryotes in a Saline Spring near the Salton Sea, California.
    Steven Bolivar, Meghan Rodela, and Jesse G. Dillon, Ph.D
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  6. Effects of Food Imitation on the Proteomics Response of the California Mussel Mytilus californianus to Acute Heat Stress: Evidence for an Energetic Trade-Off?
    Jeremy Browning, Lindsay Fitzgerald-DeHoog, and Bengt J. Allen, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  7. Coercivity Enhancement with Grain Size in Metallo-Organic Thin-Films.
    Brian Cacha, Matthew Byrne, Mathew Werber, Thomas Gredig
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  8. ENV7 Gene in S. cerevisiae Involved in Cellular Stress Response.
    Erika Calle and Editte Gharakhanian, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  9. A Study of Dynamic Kinetic Resolution in the Synthesis of Chiral β-Substituted [3.3.0]-Bicyclic Lactams.
    Phillip A. Campos, Joe D. Ferraro, and Paul T. Buonora, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  10. Characterizing the Binding of Enzyme Inhibitors at the Molecular and Ensemble Levels.
    Samantha M. Cao1, Benjamin D. Pham1, Yi An1,5, Richard Wang2, Mutaz Alsayegh3, Amethyst Radcliffe4, and Eric J. Sorin, Ph.D.1
    1Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 2Computer Engineering & Computer Science, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 3Mathematics & Statistics, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 4Physics & Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; and 5Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M, College Station, TX 77842.
  11. Poster: Evaluating Diseases Generated by Mutated Collagen Proteins Evaluating Diseases Generated by Mutated Collagen Proteins.
    Erik Carpio1, Carolyn C. Kusaba2, Richard Wang3, Felisha Eugenio1, Sarav Patel2, and Eric J. Sorin, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840, 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; and 3Computer Engineering and Computer Science, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  12. Mating Preferences in Drosophilia melanogaster.
    Julio Castro1 and Ashley J.R. Carter Ph.D.2
    1Cerritos College, Department of Biological Science, Norwalk CA 90650, 2California State University Long Beach. 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach CA 90840.
  13. Poster: S Saprophytic Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces the Immunomodulatory Prostaglandin E2 S Saprophytic Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces the Immunomodulatory Prostaglandin E2.
    Aniska Y. Chikhalya and Eric Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  14. Constructing a Anticarsia gemmatalis M nucleopolyhedrovirus bacmid.
    Tiffany L. Chu, Dee Dee Luu, and Eric J. Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840.
  15. Poster: Crystal Structure of YCaGaO4 Crystal Structure of YCaGaO4.
    Ryan C. Clark, Shou-Tian Zheng, Ph.D., Xianhui Bu, Ph.D., and Shahab Derakhshan, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  16. Poster: Characterization of the Epitope Specificity of the Human Recombinant Antimannan Antibody M2 Characterization of the Epitope Specificity of the Human Recombinant Antimannan Antibody M2.
    Christopher Danly, Wei Liao, Gayle Boxx, Wei-Fen Hart, Nicole Johnson, and Mason Zhang, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  17. Poster: Genetic Analysis of Potential Interactions between 18w and X-Chromosome; Genes in Salivary Gland Formation of Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Analysis of Potential Interactions between 18w and X-Chromosome; Genes in Salivary Gland Formation of Drosophila melanogaster.
    Kristianne Lazo1, Timothy De la Cruz2, Zoila Medina3, and Elizabeth Eldon, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 2Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808; and 3Cerritos College, Cerritos, CA 90650.
  18. Poster: Affinity Purification of Primary MicroRNAs: System Setup Affinity Purification of Primary MicroRNAs: System Setup.
    Joselyn Del Cid1, Danny Tang2, and Chang-Zheng Chen, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 90345.
  19. Poster: Nonparametric Alternative to Poly-k Test in Animal Tumorigenicity Studies Nonparametric Alternative to Poly-k Test in Animal Tumorigenicity Studies.
    Kristina D. Dill and Hojin Moon, Ph.D.
    Department of Mathematics and Statistics, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  20. Antiviral Role of Gloverin Against the Budded Virus Autographica californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus.
    Angelica Dulce1, Peter Garcia2, Daniela A. Moreno-Habel1, and Eric J. Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650.
  21. Poster: Changes in Cell Proliferation during Estrous Cycle, Photoperiod Exposure, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition in the Ovary of Siberian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) Changes in Cell Proliferation during Estrous Cycle, Photoperiod Exposure, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition in the Ovary of Siberian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).
    Sydney L. Featherstone, Jamie J. Simmons, and Kelly A. Young, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  22. Selective Small-Molecule Membrane Transport via Synthetic Molecular Receptors.
    Katie M. Feher and Michael P. Schramm, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  23. Age-dependent Expression of Trim9 Gene in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus.
    Lester Lloyd Fulay1, Chris Armoskus2, Courtney Donovan2, and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.2
    1Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  24. Structural Analysis of Human Apolipoprotein E3 C-Terminal Domain by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Mass Spectrometry.
    Roy Hernandez1, Sasidhar Nirudodhi2, Mai Duong2, Claudia S. Maier, Ph.D.2, and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.1,2
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, California 90840, and 2Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331.
  25. Poster: Nanoscale Near-Field Spectroscopic Imaging of Bowties in the Visible and Infrared Frequencies Nanoscale Near-Field Spectroscopic Imaging of Bowties in the Visible and Infrared Frequencies.
    Brandon Hessler1, Ralph Damato1, Terrance Dunlap1, James Schuck, Ph.D.2, and Yohannes Abate, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley and LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720.
  26. Poster: Ascertaining the Effect of Climate Change on a Southern California Salt Marsh Ascertaining the Effect of Climate Change on a Southern California Salt Marsh.
    Justyn Hinricher1, Anastasia Shippey2, and Christine Whitcraft, Ph.D.2
    1Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA.
  27. Poster: Synthesis and Characterization of [Fe(NO)2(2,2'-Bipyridine)] Synthesis and Characterization of [Fe(NO)2(2,2'-Bipyridine)].
    Michelle Ho1, Nearada Ngov2, Rigoberto Arenas3, and Lijuan Li, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840, 2Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808, and 3Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650.
  28. Exact Determination of Green's Function in a Bulk Superconductor.
    Ovidiu Icreverzi, Thomas E. Baker, and Andreas Bill, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840.
  29. Poster: Knock-down Expression of CG6910 in Drosophila melanogaster Knock-down Expression of CG6910 in Drosophila melanogaster.
    Melissa K. Jones and Lisa S. Klig, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  30. Apolipoprotein E-containing HDL: A Potential Nanovehicle to Transport and Deliver Resveratrol to Target Sites.
    Sea Kim1 and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.1,2
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland CA 94609.
  31. Microwave-Assisted Isomerization of Alkenes by Ligand-Stabilized Pd Nanoparticles.
    Tae Y. Kim, Elham Sadeghmoghaddam, Diego J. Gavia and Young-Seok Shon, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  32. One-Pot Transformation of Propargyl Alcohols to Saturated Carbonyl Analogues Catalyzed by Palladium Nanoparticles.
    Jordan A. Koeppen, Diego Gavia, Elham Sadeghmoghaddam, and Young-Seok Shon, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  33. Tidal Locking of Neutron Star-Quark Star Binaries.
    Sam Koshy1, Prashanth Jaikumar1, and Michele Vallisneri2
    1Department of Physics & Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 169-327, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109.
  34. Membrane Estrogen Receptors Mediate Deactivation of Medial Preoptic Nucleus Mu-Opioid Receptors to Facilitate Lordosis In Female Rats.
    Nathan P. Long and Kevin Sinchak Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  35. The Effects of Inbreeding on the Developmental Stability of Four Wild Populations of Drosophila.
    Alma Madrigal and Ashley Carter, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  36. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution in the Cyclocondensative Synthesis of ?-Alkyl-5,5-bicyclic Lactams.
    Kevin D. Mahle and Paul T. Buonora, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA, 90840.
  37. Zinc Transfer Reactions Between Three Metallothionein Isoforms and Apo-Carbonic Anhydrase.
    Aaron Malone-Stratton and Andrew Mason, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  38. Multiplying Catalytic Output Through the Use of Poly-functional Substrates.
    Nicole Mangabat2, Jeanice Rodriguez1, and Michael Schramm, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Chemical Engineering, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  39. Optimization of Chemistry Reaction Kinetic Parameters through Numerical Analysis Programming.
    Victoria Marsh1, Jen-Mei Chang, Ph.D.1, and Stephen Mezyk, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Mathematics and Statistics and 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  40. Characterization of Salinity Tolerance of a Marine Bacterial Isolate From Rosarito Beach, Baja California Mexico.
    Claudia Martinez1 and Jesse Dillon, Ph.D.2
    1Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA. 90840.
  41. Temperature Dependence of the Dark Reaction Between Chloramines and Hydrogen Peroxide.
    Garrett McKay, Matthew Chagnon, Brittney Sjelin, and Stephen P. Mezyk, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  42. Antiviral Activity of Gloverin against the Budded Virus of Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus.
    Daniela A. Moreno-Habel1, Angelica Dulce1, Dee Dee Luu1, Peter Garcia2, and Eric J. Haas-Stapleton, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650.
  43. Age-Dependent Expression of Calbindin in the Developing Mouse Cerebellum.
    Thomas Mota and Houng-Wei Tsai,Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  44. Synthesize, Crystal Structure, Photocatalytic Applications and Magnetic Properties of Semiconductor Compounds: Y2FeNb1-xTaxO7 (0= x =1).
    Phoung-Hieu T. Nguyen, Malinda Tan, and Shahab Derakhshan, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  45. Consideration of Cancer Burden and Research Spending Reveals Discrepancies in Funding and Non-Optimal Resource Distribution.
    Cecine Nguyen and Ashley Carter Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  46. Trap State Dependence on Intensity of Photoexcitation in Zinc Phthalocyanine Thin Films.
    Ramsey Noah, Jorge Guerra, Eren Karadayi, and Thomas Gredig
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  47. Poster: Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Sfswap Gene in the Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus during Early Development Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Sfswap Gene in the Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus during Early Development.
    Oliva Jimenez1, Courtney Donovan2, Chris Armoskus2, and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.2
    1Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840.
  48. Cultivation of Heterotrophic Marine Bacteria Along the Pacific Coast of North America.
    Maria Ortiz, Erin Schaadt, and Jesse Dillon Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  49. An Examination of Frequency-dependent Sexual Selection in Humans.
    Alexandra Papagno1 and Ashley Carter, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Anthropology, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  50. An Examination of Heterosis or Outbreeding Depression in Drosophila melanogaster.
    Kriska Parda and Ashley J.R. Carter, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  51. Competitive Endogenous And Exogenous Ligand Binding To Human Serum Albumin.
    Andrew C. Parker, Christine M. Cosgrove, and Brian L. McClain, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  52. Microwave Synthesis of Ester Aldehydes.
    Lizeth Perez, Hannah Pham, and Paul T. Buonora, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  53. Preparation of 3 and 4-Substituted Pyrroles: Progress towards an α-Helical Peptidomimetic Library.
    Cindy Pham and Michael P. Schramm, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA. 90840.
  54. Poster: Opioid Receptor-like Receptor-1 and μ-opioid Receptor Expression in the Medial Preoptic Nucleus Neurons that Project to the Ventral Medial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Opioid Receptor-like Receptor-1 and μ-opioid Receptor Expression in the Medial Preoptic Nucleus Neurons that Project to the Ventral Medial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus.
    George Polovin, Robyn Bowlby, and Kevin Sinchak, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  55. Poster: Determining Effective Restoration Within Different Plant Communities in a Southern California Salt Marsh Determining Effective Restoration Within Different Plant Communities in a Southern California Salt Marsh.
    Rocio Ramos1, Emily Blair2, and Christine Whitcraft, Ph.D.2
    1Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  56. Poster: Macromolecular Diffusion in Implanted Hydrogels: Determining the Effects of Physiological Biofouling on Implantable Biosensors Macromolecular Diffusion in Implanted Hydrogels: Determining the Effects of Physiological Biofouling on Implantable Biosensors.
    Armando Reimer, Daniel Hernandez, Melody Loera, and Katarzyna Slowinska, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  57. Using Reactive Tracers to Measure Thermal Sweep Efficiency in EGS Reservoirs.
    Krystle D. Remmen and Matthew W. Becker, Ph.D.
    Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  58. Poster: AC Impedance Spectroscopy on Phthalocyanine Thin Films AC Impedance Spectroscopy on Phthalocyanine Thin Films.
    Kyle Robinson, Jorge Guerra, Eren Karadayi, and Thomas Gredig, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  59. The Diversity of the Bacteria in the Huntington Beach, CA Brookhurst Salt Marsh Following Restoration.
    Janice Rowell1 and J. Dillon, Ph.D.2
    1Long beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808 and 2Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  60. Polarizability of the Electron Gas in Multilayer Graphene.
    Hamed Sadeghi, Adrien Atallah, Julius De Rojas, and Andreas Bill, Ph.D.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Long Beach, CA 90840.
  61. Poster: Field Evidence of Predator-Induced Phenotypic Plasticity in the Marine Snail Nucella lamellose Field Evidence of Predator-Induced Phenotypic Plasticity in the Marine Snail Nucella lamellose.
    Sophana Sak and Bengt J. Allen, Ph. D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA, 90840.
  62. Synthesis of Dioxepinenone via NHPI Oxidation and Singlet Oxygen Ene Reaction.
    Lea Santiago1, Tuyen Nguyen2, and Paul Buonora, Ph.D.3
    1Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA 90650, 2Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808, and 3Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  63. Helical Peptide Nanocarrier for Anti-Cancer Drugs.
    Aparna B Shinde and Katarzyna Slowinska, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  64. Short Photoperiod, But Not Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases, Decreases Enzymes of The Steroidogenic Pathway in Siberian Hamster Ovaries.
    Jamie J Simmons, Sydney L Featherstone, and Kelly A Young, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  65. Poster: Age-dependent Expression Of Rora In The Developing Mouse Cortex of Hippocampus Age-dependent Expression Of Rora In The Developing Mouse Cortex of Hippocampus.
    Saori Taniguchi, Chris Armoskus, and Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  66. Effects of Aryl Di Alkyl Phosphates on Butyrylcholinesterase.
    Chanmeali Thou1, Archie D. Turner1, and Roger A. Acey, Ph.D.2
    1Long Beach City College, Long Beach, CA 90808 and 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach CA 90840.
  67. Isolation of a T-DNA Insertion into KDM5b-like Gene At1g30810; Evolutionary Distribution of SORLIP1 Promoter Elements in ELIP Genes.
    Kevin To and Judith Brusslan, Ph.D.
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  68. Acrolein, a Tobacco Smoke Component, Alters Structure and Function of ApoE.
    Tuyen N. Tran1,2, Tien Vu1, Sea Kim2, Ken Irvine2, and Vasanthy Narayanaswami, Ph.D.2
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  69. The Synthesis of Novel Single and Homobivalent Compounds as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.
    Elise Van Fossen, Omar Gallegos, Robert Esquivel, Nick Spurlock, Trina Tran, Carmen Castillo, Zandra Gomez, Kim Ngan Tu, Astor Suriano, Reyna Reya, Ken Nakayama, Ph.D., and Roger Acey, Ph.D.
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  70. Poster: Knockdown Expression of Inositol Synthase and its Developmental Effects of D. melanogaster Knockdown Expression of Inositol Synthase and its Developmental Effects of D. melanogaster.
    Eliseo Villarreal, Melissa K. Jones, Elizabeth D. Eldon, Lisa S. Klig
    Department of Biological Sciences, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach CA 90840.
  71. Poster: Synthesis, Structural Analysis, and Magnetic Properties of B-Site Ordered Double Perovskites Ca2MgOsO5, Ca2MgOsO6, Ba2MgOsO6, and Ca2ZnReO6 Synthesis, Structural Analysis, and Magnetic Properties of B-Site Ordered Double Perovskites Ca2MgOsO5, Ca2MgOsO6, Ba2MgOsO6, and Ca2ZnReO6.
    Kelley N. Vineyard1, Fady Kilada1, Jiyeong Gu, Ph.D.2, and Shahab Derakhshan, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840.
  72. Endocrine Disruption and Hepatic Protein Expression in Contaminant Exposed English Sole in the Southern California Bight.
    Claire M. Waggoner, M.S.1, Jesus A. Reyes, M.S.1,3, Jeff Armstrong, Ph.D.1,2, and Kevin M. Kelley, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840; 2Orange County Sanitation District, Fountain Valley, CA 92708; and 3Pacific Coast Environmental Conservancy, Taft, CA 93268.
  73. Poster: Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Magnetic Properties in the Novel Compound, BaYFeO4 Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Magnetic Properties in the Novel Compound, BaYFeO4.
    Friederike Wrobel1, 2, Malinda Tan1, and Shahab Derakhshan, Ph.D.1
    1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 and 2Fakultät Chemie, TU Dortmund University, 44227 Dortmund, Germany.
Back to top

Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students 2011 (ABRCMS)

St. Louis Arch

The Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) is the largest multidisciplinary student conference in the United States. This year, the conference attracted 3,300 individuals, including 1,700 undergraduate students, 400 graduate students and postdoctoral scientists and 1200 faculty, program directors and administrators. In addition to presenting their own original research, students attended specialized seminars on cutting edge research and professional development in the biomedical sciences.

Each year, the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics (CNSM) through the Jensen SAS Center, sends a group of students to attend ABRCMS. This year, three CNSM student research programs, the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP), the Research Initiative for Science Enhancement (RISE), and Bridges to the Baccalaureate (Bridges) were represented by fourteen students attending the conference in St. Louis, Missouri. Eleven students presented their own original research projects (ten poster presentations and one oral presentation). Four students won awards for outstanding presentations:

ABRCMS Banquet Hall
  • Eliseo Villarreal (LSAMP) "RNAi Knockdown Expression of Inositol Synthase in Drosophila melanogaster" (Lisa S. Klig, Ph.D., and Elizabeth D. Eldon, Ph.D. faculty research advisors, Biological Sciences)
  • Marcell Cadney (LSAMP) "Allometry and Brain Size Evolution" (Ashley Carter, Ph.D. faculty research advisor, Biological Sciences)
  • Oliva Jimenez (Bridges)- "Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Sfswap Gene in the Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus during Early Development" (Houng-Wei Tsai, Ph.D., faculty research advisor, Biological Sciences)
  • Joselyn Del Cid (RISE) "Affinity Purification of Primary MicroRNAs: System Setup" (Chang-Zheng Chen, Ph.D., faculty research advisor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 90345).
(description follows)

CSULB participants at the 2011 ABRCRMS, (standing, l-r back row): Aimee Arreygue (SAS Center Co-Director),Maria Ramirez (RISE Coordinator),Maria Ortiz (RISE),Archie Turner (Bridges), Thomas Mota (LSAMP),Daniela Moreno (RISE), Professor Marco Lopez (Chemistry and Biochemistry), Eliseo Villarreal (LSAMP), Marcell Cadney (LSAMP),Tuyen Tran (LSAMP), Professor Editte Gharakhanian (Biological Sciences), Associate Dean Henry Fung (CNSM), Mark Katayama (LSAMP Coordinator), Assistant Professor Vasanthy Narayanaswami (Chemistry and Biochemistry);(sitting, l-r front): Shanna Newton(RISE),Cecine Nguyen (LSAMP), Alma Madrigal (RISE), Steven Bolivar (RISE), Oliva Jimenez (Bridges), Joselyn del Cid (RISE), Manuel Robles (RISE)

Back to top

Faculty Research Spotlight

Stephen Mezyk, Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Cleaning Up Our Nuclear Waste: Reprocessing our Legacy Spent Fuel

Stephen Mezyk

Professor Stephen Mezyk in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at California State University at Long Beach (CSULB) is conducting research on how to reprocess legacy spent nuclear fuel. His research aims to improve the safety of stored waste by actively reducing its levels of radioactivity and toxicity. Over the past six years he has been working with collaborators at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), University of California at Irvine (UCI), University of Notre Dame (UND), Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, and Julich, Germany to elucidate the important solution radical chemistry behind solvent extraction engineering systems being planned to remediate power reactor nuclear waste. The extraction chemistry is based on designer chemical ligands in an organic solvent that are placed in contact with the used fuel that has been dissolved in highly concentrated nitric acid. These processes are designed to selectively remove the desired actinides (uranium, plutonium, americium, and curium) from the dissolved fuel solution. The recovered actinides can be used in new reactor fuel, while reducing the radioactivity and heat load of the remaining waste that is ultimately slated for disposal by burial.

The engineering design and implementation of these mixed solvent systems have been well characterized for many decades, and pilot-scale trials across the world have demonstrated their efficiency. Investigations in the U.S. have complemented the approaches taken by other countries that currently recycle used nuclear fuel, notably France and Japan. The ultimate goal is to optimize both the engineering and chemistry to maximize extraction efficiencies and minimize reprocessing costs.

However, all solvent extractions occur in a high radiation field that interacts with both the solvents and ligands. The interaction can be directly by the ionizing alpha, beta and gamma radiation causing bond breakage or ionization of the ligands themselves, or indirectly through production of radical species in both the organic and aqueous phases that subsequently react with these extractants. Both these interactions can be very detrimental, resulting in decreased ligand concentrations as well as producing interfering product species that can decrease the overall process efficiency.

The role of radiation on the chemistry of these ligands has been the focus of Mezyk's CSULB studies to date. These measurements have mainly been performed at the Radiation Research Laboratory at UND, where his visiting students and collaborators use their linear accelerator and steady-state irradiator facilities. These systems accurately mimic the gamma and beta radiation fields experienced by the ligands under anticipated reprocessing conditions. The reaction kinetics of the major radicals formed by ionizing radiation in the acidic aqueous phase, the hydroxyl (-OH) and nitrate (NO3-) species, with a variety of ligands proposed for use in these extraction systems has been determined. A series of projects, involving both undergraduate and Masters-level CSULB students, has led to multiple INL grants and collaborative journal articles describing this radical chemistry. Presently, this kinetic and mechanistic work is being extended to the organic phase, where the chemistry of solvent radical cation species with these ligands is being studied.

In addition, in 2010, Mezyk received a U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University Programs grant to examine the effects of alpha radiation on nuclear reprocessing systems. This four-year, $1.4M award was designed to determine the importance of alpha radiation on these solvent-extraction systems. As little is known about the impacts of this type of radiation, a three-component comparative study is presently underway. The alpha irradiation of model extraction systems is being performed using isotope irradiation (238Pu, 244Cm at INL and 211At at Chalmers, Sweden), ion-beams (4He2+ 20 MeV accelerator at the University of Notre Dame) and nuclear-reactor based irradiation of borated solvent systems (10B(n,α)7Li) at the University of California, Irvine. All of these approaches have their merits and drawbacks, and the initial goal of performing all three types of alpha-radiolysis studies was to quantitatively evaluate this radiation induced degradation of both free and metal-loaded ligands, and to establish the most efficient and cost-effective approach in obtaining the required yield and product data. This comparison is currently underway, and will be completed in 2012. Once the optimal alpha-irradiation system has been established additional ligand tests will be performed for the remaining duration of the project. Ultimately, combining these alpha radiolysis data with the auxiliary gamma studies, and concomitant bench-scale distribution measurements on irradiated systems, will allow all these data to be collated into a predictive computer model that can be ultimately used to model large-scale process conditions to optimize extraction ligand performance in separating actinides from spent fuel.

Mezyk joined CSULB in 2001. He earned his bachelor of science degree in chemistry and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Melbourne, Australia. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Advanced Oxidation Technologies and has received multiple research grants and contracts. He was awarded the CSULB Provost's 2010 Award for Impact Accomplishment of the Year in Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity; and the Distinguished Faculty Scholarly and Creative Achievement Award in 2008. A respected mentor and professor, Mezyk also received the University Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award in 2007. He recently won an Emmy for instructional programming for providing expert opinions on water and nuclear chemistry in the video series, "Understanding Chemistry in Your World," by Coast Learning Systems.

For more information about Mezyk's research, visit http://chemistry.csulb.edu/faculty.html.

Back to top

Back to top

Highlighting New Faces

Deborah Fraser

Deborah Fraser, Ph.D, was recruited as an Assistant Professor to the Department of Biological Sciences in Fall 2011. She hails originally from England, but has travelled extensively thanks to friends and relatives all over the globe (Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia). Growing up, she also lived in Germany for 10 years, although she says that her German is very rusty these days and includes colloquialisms not popular since the 80's! Between high school and university, she spent a year working as a nurse in a hospital in southern India. What she enjoyed most from the experience was her time spent in the haematology lab, looking at cells under microscopes, so much so that when she returned home, she switched my major from medicine to cellular pathology, and her career as a scientist began.

Deborah's first visit to California was as an undergraduate exchange student at UC-San Diego for a year, before finishing her undergraduate studies back in Bristol University in the UK. However, she enjoyed her time in California so much, that after completing a Ph.D. in Dr. Paul Morgan's complement lab in Cardiff, Wales, she returned to California as a postdoctoral scholar in a crystallography lab at the City of Hope in Duarte. She then returned to innate immunity and the complement field as a postdoc/assistant researcher in Dr. Andrea Tenner's lab at UC-Irvine. During this time she was dissecting molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response focusing on the mechanisms by which complement proteins aided clearance of apoptotic cells and damaged molecules such as oxidized LDL (so-called "bad cholesterol") with the ultimate goal of identifying novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in autoimmune/ inflammatory disease. Although her research focus has always been in innate immunology, some fun projects have also arisen from unusual collaborations. For example, she recently completed a set of studies with some engineers, looking at innate immune responses to a nanoparticle drug delivery system. Since engineers and biologists approach problems very differently, Deborah has found it ultimately very rewarding to get out of her comfort zone, and participate in interdisciplinary collaborations.

For fun, she likes to make the most of this amazing place where we live. Weekends often find her at the beach, cycling along the beach bike path on her cruiser from Newport to sunset beach (she doesn't do hills!), exploring places/parks around Los Angeles, trying new restaurants and watching live music/ theater. She is also an avid moviegoer, and can enjoy even the worst of movies, as long as she's allowed to make sarcastic comments at the screen! She still love to travel, and was excited to finally see some of the wild west this summer on a road trip with friends to Montana via Yellowstone and back via Mount Rushmore and the Grand Canyon. She can't wait to go back, and welcomes any suggestions for 'must-see' places to visit!

Back to top

Staff Perspectives

Yvette with a double rainbow in Tahiti

Born and raised in Long Beach, Biological Sciences Marine Technician Yvette Ralph's favorite pastime growing up was going to the beach. She remembers going nearly every weekend with her father to the beach to fish or just spend time near the water. So, when the time came to go to college, going to CSULB, "The Beach" was a just a logical next step, and the decision to major in Marine Biology was second nature. Following the completion of her B.S. in Marine Biology, Yvette felt fortunate to gain employment near the beach at the Cabrillo Marine Museum in San Pedro where she had volunteered while in school.

After deciding to return to CSULB for her Masters in Biology, Yvette interned at the Orange County Sanitation District. As an intern, her primary responsibility was ocean monitoring which located her in her favorite place to be on a regular basis. As an intern, she spent time collecting invertebrate specimens from the soft bottom communities, weighing and measuring them. The County used the resulting measurements to measure the overall health of water around wastewater outfalls. In addition, Yvette participated in trawling the ocean floor. This was an additional indicator of the diversity and the health of the sea life and the habitat of the soft bottom communities. She credits the internship with giving her an excellent background in the taxonomy of the invertebrates common to southern California. These specimens are very similar to the ones she collects for the marine lab. Crab collected from trawling Yvette noted that most of the classes in the biology program come through the lab, and having live specimens makes a huge difference in learning the taxonomy. As a graduate student, she also was awarded a Boeing Scholarship, which helped fund her thesis research project of working with marsh plants.

She also sought certification in scuba diving, and to gain hours, she looked for a diving job in the Long Beach area, but there were was nothing available, so she spent a couple of years working at the University of California, Santa Barbara where she was able to volunteer at the University as a diver to gain hours. What Yvette likes best about diving is that it is so calm and serene under the water, and at the same time you never know what you are going to see. The most unexpected thing that she has seen was a thresher shark that was just suddenly "there." Her favorite invertebrate are the octopi because they are so smart.

Always looking for "beach opportunities," when the position of marine technician became available in the Department of Biological Sciences, Yvette applied, and the rest is history. She can be found most days in the marine lab, maintaining the boats, at the beach, or diving to collect for the lab in the rocky intertidal areas.

Her biggest challenge as the Marine Biology Technician has been the move from the temporary marine lab in PH2 to the new marine lab in HSCI. Diving off Palo Verde Getting the system stable in time for the HSCI Dedication and Open House, and the fall semester was a big push; the time it takes to condition the water can't be shortened by much and allowing enough time was a critical factor in the success of the move. Nevertheless, the lab was open with animals in the tanks, and as the water has gradually conditioned during the fall semester, more animals are being added in. Yvette aims to have full collections in the lab by the spring semester.

Yvette collects locally from the breakwall around Long Beach, and from the tide pools. Each location has its own distinct marine community including the plankton. She recruits volunteers to the marine lab to help her collect. In addition, they help scrub the tanks and feed the collections. Yvette said that volunteers learn what makes up the marine communities, including the fact that the plankton provided in the lab is different from the plankton in the intertidal communities offshore.

In addition to the keeping the marine lab going, Yvette is also the College's Boating Safety Officer, and is in charge of ensuring that the college watercraft is operated in compliance with the CNSM Boating Safety Manual, other University policies, and government regulations associated with travel and field operations. In addition to the many duties of maintaining the watercraft, Yvette is also responsible for reviewing float plans before boats are taken out, as well as supervising the Boating Safety Program Training.

Back to top

Save These Dates!

  • Wednesday, February 29, 2012
    CNSM Basketball Night: Men's Basketball vs. CSU Fullerton, 7:00 p.m.
  • Friday, March 2, 2012
    4th Annual CNSM Faculty Research Symposium
    CNSM Faculty Research Symposium
    University Student Union Ballroom
    12:30-5:30 p.m.
    Abstracts due Friday, February 3, 2012.
  • Tuesday, April 10, 2012
    CNSM Student Council presents:
    34th Annual Nobel Laureate Lecture
    Martin Chalfie, 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP"
    Martin Chalfie
    University Student Union Ballroom
    General Lecture 11:00 12:00 p.m.
    Technical Session 4:005:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, May 10, 2012
    Annual CSULB Alumni Dinner @ Hyatt Regency, Long Beach
  • Friday, May 25, 2012
    Annual Commencement
    CNSM Ceremony is at 1:00 p.m.
Back to top