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Teaching Materials

HomeBeyond the Bubble unlocks the vast digital archive of the Library of Congress to create a new generation of history assessments. Developed by the Stanford History Education Group, Beyond the Bubble is the cornerstone of SHEG’s membership in the Library of Congress’s Teaching with Primary Sources Educational Consortium. We “go beyond the bubble” by offering easy-to-use assessments that capture students’ knowledge in action – rather than their recall of discrete facts.

 

 

Imagine exploring 13.7B years of history – from the Big Bang to modernity. Big history tells the complete story–with a goal of revealing common themes and patterns that help students better understand people, civilizations and our place in the  universe. The Big History Project is a collaboration designed to bring big history to life for high school students. It is entering the second year of a pilot program designed to create and refine a world class curriculum and online experience that will ultimately be freely available to schools worldwide. More than 80 partner schools are enrolled in our current pilot program.

 

CommonplaceCommon-place is a common place for exploring and exchanging ideas about early American history and culture. A bit friendlier than a scholarly journal, a bit more scholarly than a popular magazine, Common-place speaks–and listens–to scholars, museum curators, teachers, hobbyists, and just about anyone interested in American history before 1900. Common-place is a common place for all sorts of people to read about all sorts of things relating to early American life–from architecture to literature, from politics to parlor manners. And it’s a place to find insightful analysis of early American history as it is discussed not only in scholarly literature but also on the evening news; in museums, big and small; in documentary and dramatic films; and in popular culture.

 

Historical Thinking Matters provides high school students with a framework that teaches them to read documents like historians. Using these “habits of mind,” they will be able to interrogate historical sources and use them to form reasoned conclusions about the past. Equally important, they will become critical users of the vast historical archives on the web. Historical Thinking Matters equips students to navigate the uncharted waters of the World Wide Web. The site is the winner of the American Historical Association’s 2008 James Harvey Robinson Prize for an Outstanding Teaching Aid.

 

HISTORY MATTERS - The U.S. Survey Course on the WebWelcome to History Matters, a project of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning of the City University of New York and the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Visible Knowledge Project. Designed for high school and college teachers and students of U.S. history survey courses, this site serves as a gateway to web resources and offers unique teaching materials, first-person primary documents, and guides to analyzing historical evidence.We emphasize materials that focus on the lives of ordinary Americans and actively involve students in analyzing and interpreting evidence. We welcome your participation in expanding and improving the site.

 

The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use.

 

 

Teachinghistory.org is designed to help K–12 history teachers access resources and materials to improve U.S. history education in the classroom. Teachinghistory.org, funded through the Office of Innovation and Improvement’s Teaching American History (TAH) program, builds on and disseminates the valuable lessons learned by more than 1,000 TAH projects designed to raise student achievement by improving teachers’ knowledge and understanding of traditional U.S. history. The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (CHNM) has created Teachinghistory.org with the goal of placing history content, teaching strategies, current research and issues, community building, and easy access to resources at center stage. We aim to bring together the many communities involved in improving history education and professional development for history teachers, allowing practitioners, historians, administrators, and history educators to present multiple perspectives, debate current issues, and work together to improve history teaching in classrooms throughout the United States.

 

The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents modified for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities.This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip’s War to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and make historical claims backed by documentary evidence.

 

World History Connections

 

 

 

 

World History For Us All LogoWorld History for Us All is a powerful, innovative model curriculum for teaching world history in middle and high schools.

 

World History for Us All:

  • offers a treasury of teaching units, lesson plans, and resources.
  • presents the human past as a single story rather than unconnected stories of many civilizations.
  • helps teachers meet state and national standards.
  • enables teachers to survey world history without excluding major peoples, regions, or time periods.
  • helps students understand the past by connecting specific subject matter to larger historical patterns.
  • draws on up-to-date historical research.
  • may be readily adapted to a variety of world history programs.

World History for Us All is a national collaboration of K-12 teachers, collegiate instructors, and educational technology specialists. It is a project of San Diego State University in cooperation with the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA. World History for Us All is a continuing project. Elements under development will appear on the site in the coming months.