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California State University, Long Beach
Department of Sociology
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Dr. Shelley Eriksen, Professor


(Joint appointment with the Department of Human Development)

Email: shelley.eriksen@csulb.edu
Office: PSY 126
Phone: (562) 985-2124

Main Courses:
Sociology of Family (SOC 320)
Sociology of Women (SOC 325)
Families & Work (HDEV 340)
Seminar & Practicum (HDEV 470)

Research Interests:
Gender, race & class; families; health & medicine; sociology of the body; research methods; violence studies & prevention

Education:
B.S. (summa cum laude), Sociology, Southern Oregon University, 1986
M.A., Ph.D. (summa cum laude), Sociology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 1998

Selected publications:
Eriksen, Shelley. 2012. “’ To cut or not to cut: Cosmetic surgery usage and women’s age-related
experiences,” International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 74(1), 1-24.

Eriksen, Shelley & Beth Manke. 2011. “’Because being fat means being sick: Children at risk of Type 2 diabetes,” Sociological Inquiry, 81(4), 549-589.

Eriksen, Shelley and Sara Goering. 2011. “A test of the agency hypothesis in women’s cosmetic
surgery usage,” Sex Roles, 64(11-12), 888-901.

Eriksen, Shelley & Beth Manke. 2009. “Food as intangible heritage and cultural problematic.”
Sharing Cultures. S. Lira, R. Amoeda, C. Pinheiro, J. Pinheiro & F. Oliveira (eds.) (pp. 193-200), Barcelos, Portugal: Green Lines Institute.

Eriksen, Shelley and Vickie Jensen. 2008. “A push or a punch: Distinguishing the severity of sibling violence,” Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 24(1), pp. 183-208.

Eriksen, Shelley J. and Vickie Jensen. 2006. “All in the family? Family environment factors in sibling violence,” Journal of Family Violence, 21, No. 8 (November), pp. 497-507.

Eriksen, Shelley J. and Naomi Gerstel. 2002. “A labor of love or labor itself: Care work among
adult brothers and sisters,” Journal of Family Issues, 23, 836-856.