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California State University, Long Beach
Psychology
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Laurie Kliewer, MA

PSYCHOLOGY MASTER’S THESIS ABSTRACT
Industrial/Organizational
June 1995

Exercise, Sleep and Diet: Their Effect on Health in Dealing with the Demand/Control Model of Stress

    According to the Demand/Control model of stress, unresolved stress can adversely affect health.  Therefore, managing unresolved stress can be important in maintaining good health.  This study examined interaction of perceived demand and control with sleep, diet, and exercise in 97 respondents.  Decision latitude and job demand were predictor variables and diet, sleep and exercise were criterion variables.
    Results were: (a) a negative correlation between job demand and sleep, but no support for a positive correlation between decision latitude and sleep; (b) no support for the hypothesis of a negative correlation between job demand and diet; the data were in the right direction for a positive correlation between decision latitude and diet; (c) no support for the hypothesis of a negative correlation between job demand and exercise or a positive correlation between decision latitude and exercise.  Additional analysis showed that diet affected the strength of the relationship between decision latitude and illness and between decision latitude and symptoms.