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Programs

CSULB offers a range of courses related to India in various discipline. Below are details about each of these courses, along with the departments that offer them. Please note that this list is not exhaustive and courses are subject to change from semester to semester.

ART HISTORY

  • AH 113A: Survey Asian Art: Early Sacred Culture

Survey of art as an integral part of Asian culture: India and SE Asia, China, and Japan from earliest times to c. 1000.

  • AH 113A: Survey Asian Art: Later Traditions

Survey of art as an integral part of Asian culture: India and SE Asia, China, and Japan from earliest times from c. 1000 to 1900.

  • AH 466/566: Buddhist Art of India and South East Asia

Formation and development of Buddhist art in India and subsequent metamorphoses in Cambodia, Thailand and Indonesia examined.

  • AH 467/567: Hindu and Islamic Art of India

Formation and development of Hindu art in India and the genesis, as well as transformation, of Islamic art of India compared to pan-Islamic characteristics will be examined.

  • AH 497/597: Seminar in Art History (Topical)

Directed individual research and group discussion concerning a topic in art history.

 

ASIAN AND ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

  • A/ST 300I: Traditional Asia

Interdisciplinary examination of traditional civilizations of Asia. This team-taught course focuses on two Asian civilizations, normally China and India, and may periodically focus on Japan. Course examines topics related to Asian cultures to illustrate the richness and diversity of Asia.

  • A/ST 301I: Modern Asia

Emphasis on development of Asia since the 18th century and its role in the modern world; some attention to the experience of Asians in the U.S. Continuity and change, reform and revolution in culture, politics and the economy will be included.

  • A/ST 310: United States and Asia

Focusing on the post-1945 period, this course will examine four main areas: (1) key religious, social and political patterns in Asia; (2) cross-cultural images of Asia and America; (3) Asian-U.S. global economic relations; and (4) Asian-U.S. strategic and political relationships.

  • A/ST 406B: Asian Women: South and Southeast Asia

Emphasis on modern period; the course explores the complexities of women’s roles in multicultural, multilingual societies in South and Southeast Asia, including gender as a continuing site of contention in nationalist discourse.

  • A/ST 490: Special Topics in Asian Studies: Hindi Language, Literature and Culture

An introduction to Indian culture through the select study of Hindi language, literature and film. Topics include history; language, politics and regionalism; film representations (Bollywood); and some premodern and modern Hindi literature and stories in translation. No prior knowledge of Hindi is required.

  • A/ST 492/592: Proseminar in Asian Studies (Topical)  

Introduction to research methods. Intensive study of selected conceptual and theoretical issues in Asian Studies or Asian American Studies. Area and discipline of emphasis will vary from year to year.

  • A/ST 551: Hinduism

Survey of ancient, classical and medieval Hinduism. Emphasis on analysis of Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita and the various paths of Yoga.   

  • A/ST 610: Proseminar in Asian Studies (Topical)  

Selected topics in Asian Studies. Area and discipline of emphasis will vary from year to year. Open to graduate students of Asian Studies. Graduate students in other disciplines may enroll with consent of instructor.

 

COMPARATIVE WORLD LITERATURE AND CLASSICS

  • CWL 101: Introduction to Comparative World Literature

An introduction to the basics of literary interpretation and comparative literature. This course is strongly recommended for majors in Comparative World Literature.

  • CWL 103: Introduction to Comparative Asian Literature and Culture

Introduction to two major Asian cultures- India and China- through an exploration of their literatures, cultures, and diasporas. Focus will be on the modern period.

  • CWL 124: Introduction to World Theatre and Drama

Introduction to all aspects of theatre including criticism, dramatic literature, movements, themes, historical background and theatrical production from different parts of the world.

  • CWL 403/503: Studies in Asian Literature

Interrelationships of two or more authors, themes, genres, movements or aspects of literature and culture in Asia or between Asia and the West.

  • CWL 415I: Ethnic Literature and Culture in America

Comparative, interdisciplinary study of multicultural literature in historical and sociopolitical context. Ethnic groups include Native American, African American, Latino/Latina, Asian American and Middle Eastern American.

 

GEOGRAPHY

  • GEOG 314I: South Asia

Cross-cultural examination of the characteristics and problems found across South Asia, specifically, environmental and cultural patterns, historical development of the spatial organization of society, demographic and other dynamics of social change, and issues of socio-economic and political development. This course will satisfy an interdisciplinary capstone requirement.

 

HISTORY

  • HIST 211: World History: Origins to 1500

A survey of the development of world civilization and major cultures from the Neolithic Revolution until the eve of the European conquest of the Americas.  The civilizations of the Ancient, Classical and Postclassical periods will be studied, emphasizing interaction between civilizations and major cultures.  Topics will include:  the origins and role of universal religions; the examination of political, social and gender structures in relation to economic and demographic development; and the diffusion of culture and technology via migration, commerce and the expanse of empire.

  • HIST 212: World History: Since 1500

A survey of the origin and development of the modern world, tracing both regional histories and global interactions.  Major themes include:  economic aspects of globalization; intellectual and cultural adjustments to modernity; modern imperialism, resistance to empire and the birth of nations; and the historical origins of the contemporary world.

  • HIST 385: History of India

This is a survey of the history of the South Asian subcontinent from its historic roots, through the founding and consolidation of the great Mughal Empire, to the beginnings of Western imperialism and the establishment of the British Raj, ending with nationalism and the course of events in post-independence India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

  • HIST 396: Contemporary World History

A world historical approach to the study of the twentieth century. Themes include: the changing global economy and environment; the advance and retreat of empires; colonialism and post-colonialism; contending ideologies; the intensification of globalization at the end of the century.

  • HIST 406B: Asian Women: South and Southeast Asia

Same course as A/ST 406B

 

MUSIC

  • MUS 490: Introduction to Music Cultures

Music of various world cultures and ethnic groups representative of diversity of United States. The course includes music’s function, social organization including age and gender roles, distinctive characteristics, types of instruments, and cultural performance standards. Historical and critical survey with emphasis on basic ideas and traditions.

 

PHILOSOPHY

  • PHIL 307: Philosophies of India

Historical and critical survey with emphasis on basic ideas and traditions.

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

  • R/ST 103: Introduction to World Religions II (Eastern)

Survey of Indian, Chinese and Japanese religious thought. Emphasis will be on original texts in translations.

  • R/ST 351: Hinduism

Introduction to the religious traditions of Hinduism. The course emphasis is on the historical and textual study of Hinduism through its various literatures (sacred, narrative, poetic, liturgical, and philosophical). It explores Vedic traditions of sacrifice, the speculative philosophy of the Upanishads, the religious epic and mythological literature, the main gods and goddesses, and the devotional poetry of the medieval poet-saints.

  • R/ST 352: Religions of India

A survey of Indian religions to the present. Emphasis will be on the ways that religions of historic India have developed and interacted.

  • R/ST 442/542: Buddhist Ethics

A systematic exploration of the place of ethics and moral reasoning in Buddhist thought and practice. The scope of the course is wide, with examples drawn from the whole Buddhist world, but emphasis is on the particularity of different Buddhist visions of the ideal human life. Attention is given to the problems of the proper description of Buddhist ethics in a comparative perspective.

  • R/ST 448: Theravada Buddhism

Introduction to main features of Theravada thought and practice, especially in historic and contemporary Southeast Asia. We explore the “Way of the Elders,” taking refuge in the Triple-Gem. Emphasis is on internal diversity and multiple voices of tradition.

  • R/ST 456/556: Introductory Sanskrit I

Students will learn devanagari, the script most commonly used for Sanskrit. Primary focus on grammar, reading, translation, and composition exercises. The course is also an introduction to Indian culture using the Ramayana, a popular text in Indian history.

  • R/ST 457/557: Introductory Sanskrit II

Students will learn devanagari, the script most commonly used for Sanskrit. Primary focus on grammar, reading, translation, and composition exercises. The course is also an introduction to Indian culture using the Ramayana, a popular text in Indian history.

  • R/ST 646: Seminar in Buddhist Studies

Advanced inquiry into topics in Buddhist Studies.

 

WOMEN’S STUDIES

           

  • W/ST 406B: Asian Women: South and Southeast Asia

Same as A/ST 406B