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Courses

Summer 2014

Latin Course (LAT)

Comparative World Literature Courses (CWL)

 

LAT 300. Intensive Latin (6)
Equivalent to two semesters of Elementary Latin. Designed for undergrad and graduate students with little or no knowledge of Latin, whose degree programs require or recommend a reading knowledge of the language.

CWL 315i. Literature and Medicine (3)
Interdisciplinary examination of the complex relationship between medicine and human experience, integrating materials from the humanities and social sciences to explore diverse experiences across cultures, between and among genders, and in various economic and social contexts.

CWL 320i. Comic Spirit (3)
Study of comedy as a literary genre and of the manifestation of the comic spirit in related art forms such as music, art, and film, focusing on the history and philosophy of comedy as well as theories of laughter.

Fall 2014

Classics Courses (CLSC)

100. The Classical World of Greece and Rome (3)
Introduction to the literature, language and culture of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Use of primary sources, such as drama, epic, inscriptions, and the visual arts to explore issues of gender, mythology, theater, combat and sports, slavery and family.

101. Greek Mythology (3)
A survey of the major Greek myths, sagas and tales of gods and heroes, and their influence on later eras, particularly ancient Rome. Not open for credit to students with credit in CLSC 191.

110. Classical Archaeology (3)
Introduction to the study of the material culture of Greece, Etruria and Rome from the Minoans to the Constantine. Covers history of archaeology, chronology and dating systems and analytical methods of material culture including urban planning, construction techniques, and architecture.

201. Ancient Greek Literature (3)
A survey of the literature of ancient Greece in translation, from Homer and Hesiod to Lucian and the novelists (c. 700 BC to AD 400).

300i. Pagan Culture (3)
Examines the mass cultures of the Greek and Roman periods, its worldview, and its philosophic and religious underpinnings through literary, artistic, archaeological and documentary sources. Not open for credit to students with credit in CLSC 310i.

340. The Underworld (3)
In-depth investiation of the realm of the dead as given in ancient Greeek and Roman myth. Topics include its topography and populations, journeys to it, and interpretations of it. Comparative analysis of ancient myths of the underworld from other cultures.

470. Monuments of Athens (3)
Athens is known as the birthplace of democracy. Studies the extensive remains of key structures and monuments of ancient Athens and how they relate to the history and development of one of the most famous of all ancient cities.

 

Comparative World Literature General Education Courses (CWL)

100. Introduction to World Literature (3)
Readings in translation from world literature. Emphasis on how literature engages unique cultural elements around the world as well as cross-cultural comparisons.

124. Introduction to World Theatre and Drama (3)
Introduction to all aspects of theatre including criticism, dramatic literature, movements, themes, historical background and theatrical production from different parts of the world.

132. Folklore and Mythology (3)
Introduction to the study of mythology and folklore in a global context, with an emphasis on their application in literature.

161. Reading the World (3)
Introduction to contemporary theories of reading and interpretation. Examination of diverse forms of human expression and critical understanding from around the world and across the disciplines designed to develop and refine a broad repertoire of reading tools and practices.
Prerequisite/Corequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 100 or equivalent.

213. Visual Studies: Comics and Graphic Novels (3)
Introductory study of Comics and Graphic Novels across cultures and within global contexts by emphasizing visual narrative storytelling as well as the political, social and visual trends that have shaped the powerful creative industry of comics around the world.

220. Literature and Play (3)
Explores the interrelation of human physiological, social, and psychological states of being as represented in culturally and historically diverse works of literature concentrated upon the nature of human play and the purpose of human games.

Comparative World Literature Upper-Division and Graduate Courses (CWL)

315i. Literature and Medicine (3)
Interdisciplinary examination of the complex relationship between medicine and human experience, integrating materials from the humanities and social sciences to explore diverse experiences across cultures, between and among genders, and in various economic and social contexts.

320i. Comic Spirit (3)
Study of comedy as a literary genre and of the manifestation of the comic spirit in related art forms such as music, art, and film, focusing on the history and philosophy of comedy as well as theories of laughter.

324i. Theatre Today (3)
Examines current trends, achievements and problems in contemporary western theatre and dramatic literature. Particular attention will be paid to multicultural expression in the theatre. Same course as THEA 324i.

330A. Masterpieces of European Literature (3)
Representative selections, in translation, of European texts to and since the Renaissance, and their relation to the development of Western civilization.

344. Literature of the Holocaust (3)
Intensive study of literary works of different genres and cultural backgrounds, from 1945 to the present, to analyze the strategies writers use to present the historical events and the cultural reverberations of the Holocaust.

349. Special Topics: Literary Movements: Experimental Theatre (3)
TBA!

361. Masterpieces of Literary Criticism (3)
Study of literary criticism from Plato to the present, focusing on history of literary and cultural theory as well as methods of critical analysis applied to literary texts and other forms of cultural expression.

412i. Art and Literature (3)
Interdisciplinary study of 19th and 20th Century art and literature, emphasizing comparative analysis of styles, methods, principles, and movements across genres as well as major artists, writers and theorists in their social and historical contexts.

414. Medieval World (3)
Interdisciplinary examination of major themes in medieval society and culture, with an emphasis on literature, the arts, and the historical forces that combined to produce medieval culture as a whole.

415i. Ethnic Literature and Culture in America (3)
Comparative, interdisciplinary study of multicultural literature in historical and sociopolitical context. Ethnic groups include Native American, African American, Latino/Latina, Asian American and Middle Eastern American.

449A. Special Topics: Nobel Prize Laureates (3)
Intensive and comparative study of one to three major authors.

451i. Film and Novel in Society (3)
Interdisciplinary study of two genres, with particular focus on novels made into films and on aesthetic distinction of both forms as major genres in the 20th and 21st centuries.

492. Internship Program (3)
Field work in literature-related industries. Internships and other assignments directed by a supervising faculty member.

495. Genre (3)
Production of student journal, Genre, including editing, design, soliciting contributors, working with printer, desktop publishing, and financial management. Contact department office for information.

 

Greek Courses (GK)

101A. Elementary Greek (4)
Introduction to ancient Greek, the language of Sophocles, Plato, Aristophanes, Homer and Demosthenes. Forms, syntax and basic vocabulary leading also to a reading knowledge of New Testament Greek. Designed for those beginning a study of ancient Greek.

404. Historians (3)
Reading from selections from Herodotus, Thucydides and/or Xenophon.

 

Latin Courses (LAT)

101A. Elementary Latin (4)
Introduction to the Latin language as used by Vergil, Cicero, Livy, Catullus, Tacitus, and Juvenal as well as late Latin and medieval writers. Basic forms, syntax, and basic vocabulary leading to a reading knowledge.

101B. Elementary Latin (4)
Continuation of LAT 101A.

301. Elementary Latin (4)
Continued study of the language and culture of the ancient Romans. Reading and translating selections of classical writers.

404. Latin Epic (3)
Prerequisite: LAT 301 or equivalent.
Reading of selections from Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura and/or Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

406. Historiography of the Empire (3)
Prerequisite: LAT 301 or equivalent.
Reading of selections from Livy and/or Tacitus.

410C. Latin Prose Composition (1)
Thorough instruction in writing Latin prose at the advanced level. Extensive coverage of syntax and morphology of Latin.