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California State University, Long Beach
Asian and Asian American Studies
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Student Learning Outcomes

Department of Asian and Asian American Studies

The Department of Asian and Asian American Studies has four undergraduate and one graduate programs:  (1) B.A. in Asian American Studies; (2) B.A. and M.A. in Asian Studies; (3) B.A. in Chinese Studies; and (4) B.A. in Japanese.  Each degree program has its own student learning outcomes.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES    

When students complete their degree requirements, they will be able to achieve the following student learning outcomes.

I. B.A. in Asian American Studies                                                                          

Upon completion of the B.A. degree in Asian American Studies, students will be able to:

  1. Think critically in terms of constructing arguments and presenting evidence to support their views through oral and written communication.
  2. Understand crucial issues affecting the lives of Asian Americans and their relations to the dominant society and other ethnic groups in contemporary U.S. society.  This includes challenging racial stereotypes through an understanding of the social, economic, political, and cultural perspectives of issues associated with race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and the politics of representation in the various Asian American communities and in the dominant culture.
  3. Be familiar with interdisciplinary theoretical approaches to the study of ethnicity, human migration, cultural adaptation, and strategies of resistance which draw attention to the socio-political reality that conflict and change are integral components of the American experience.
  4. Analyze the role of the state affecting, and affected by, Asian immigrants and their U.S.-born descendants.  Central to this topic are the value of citizenship and the roles of individual leaders who have been instrumental in the development of a multicultural society in the United States.
  5. Understand gender roles, gender relations, “traditional” and alternative forms of families and approaches to parenting, interethnic relations, and biracial and multicultural identities in Asian America.

II. BA in Asian Studies

The B.A. in Asian Studies meets the GE Requirements for two Student Learning Outcomes: Integrative Learning and Global Competencies.  The goals of these two objectives are: (1) “to recognize and respond to complexity of problems or issues by making reasonable and innovative connections across multiple perspectives and frameworks”; and (2) “to consistently use worldview frameworks without stereotypes and interpret intercultural experiences from the perspective of both one’s and another’s world views.”

Upon completion of the B.A. degree in Asian Studies, students will be able to:

  1. Identify basic facts about Asian history, social institutions and religions and how Asian cultures have been stereotyped in the West.
  2. Identify the modern countries of Asia while understanding the different geographical boundaries in the ancient period; demonstrate an understanding of the causes of boundary changes; demonstrate an understanding of how geography determines “monsoon Asia” and the cultural significance of this.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge about the basic socio-religious contours of traditional Asian society and their relationship to the development of political forms (while being conscious of Western stereotyping).
  4. Compare and contrast the major beliefs of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Islam and other ideologies such as Maoism and Japanese Exceptionalism (Nihonjinron) within a specific cultural and historical context (while being conscious of Western stereotyping).
  5. Discuss the significance of gender and class in the socioeconomic and political contexts of traditional and modern Asia.
  6. Explain the different modes of social and cultural analysis of major events in Asia from the traditional to contemporary periods.
  7. Understand the importance of trade in the cultural flows throughout the region and how technology transfers created change throughout the ancient world up to contemporary globalization.
  8. Demonstrate a rudimentary understanding of the written and conversational forms of one Asian language.
  9. Demonstrate depth of knowledge in one area/nation of Asia.

III. MA in Asian Studies

Upon completion of the M.A. degree in Asian Studies, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of a methodology appropriate for conducting research in at least one chosen discipline or concentration of studies.
  2. Demonstrate fluency in an appropriate language to conduct original research on an Asia-specific topic.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to apply methodology to research in a chosen discipline or       concentration.
  4. Demonstrate conversational ability in an Asian or other appropriate language and enough proficiency to use that language for research purposes.
  5. Have produced two original research papers that demonstrate: (1) an application of methodology and utilization of resources in an Asian or other appropriate language after completing A/S 592; and (2) ability to conduct independent research based on a topic provided in A/ST 610.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to pass the OPI and JLPT [second level] (for students with Japanese as one of their fields); or the ability to pass the SAT for Chinese (for students with Chinese Studies as one of their fields.).

IV. B.A. in Chinese Studies

The Chinese Studies Program seeks to produce graduates who have communication skills, critical thinking skills, and socio-cultural understanding for effective intercultural communication and interaction in Chinese in a manner that is culturally and linguistically appropriate.

Upon completion of the B.A. degree in Chinese Studies, students will be able to:

  1. Converse, process and provide information, and express orally feelings and opinions, including formal presentations, on uncomplicated routine tasks and social situations related to work, school, recreation, individual interests and areas of competence.
  2. Write essays, e-mails, and reports in connected sentences and paragraphs, with reasonable control of structure, on topics related to family, work, school, recreation, contemporary issues, and areas of competence.
  3. Identify, while listening or reading, main ideas and some details on many topics in extended passages through recognition of key words, phrases, and sentence structures in familiar and unfamiliar contexts.
  4. Identify, examine, and discuss connections among cultural perspectives, socially approved behavioral patterns and material culture.
  5. Have a positive attitude toward intercultural communication in general and toward China and Chinese culture in particular.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to continue learning independently.

V. B.A. in Japanese

The Japanese Program seeks to produce graduates who have communication skills, critical thinking skills, and socio-cultural understanding for effective intercultural communication and interaction in Japanese in a manner that is culturally and linguistically appropriate.

Upon completion of the B.A. degree in Japanese, students will be able to:

  1. Converse, process and provide information, and express orally feelings and opinions, including formal presentations, on uncomplicated routine tasks and social situations related to work, school, recreation, individual interests and areas of competence.
  2. Write personal letters, e-mails, and reports in connected sentences and paragraphs, using hiragana, katakana, and basic kanji, with reasonable control of structure, on topics related to family, work, school, recreation, contemporary issues, and areas of competence.
  3. Identify, while listening or reading, main ideas and some details on many topics in extended passages through recognition of key words, phrases, and sentence structures in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, including kanji in written material.
  4. Identify, examine, and discuss connections among cultural perspectives, socially approved behavioral patterns and material culture (e.g., business cards) within the Japanese cultural context.
  5. Have a positive attitude toward intercultural communication in general and toward Japan and Japanese culture in particular.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to continue learning independently.

Contact Us

Department of Asian and Asian American Studies

Contact us at 562-985-4645 or stop by our office in FO3-340

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