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California State University, Long Beach
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Master of Social Work Concentration Areas

The Master of Social Work degree offers opportunity for study in one of three areas of concentration:

      • Child and Family Wellbeing
      • Adulthood and Aging
      • Integrated Health

Students rank their choice of concentration in the first semester of the foundation year. The second-year courses and field placement will be determined by this choice of concentration. While students are not required to designate a concentration, program stipend recipients and students who choose to complete the Pupil Personnel Services Credential are required to choose a specific concentration. 

Child and Family Wellbeing Concentration

The Child and Family Wellbeing concentration prepares students to use strength-based and evidence-based approaches to promote positive child and family functioning across diverse populations. Through coursework and field placements, students will acquire and enhance their skills to effectively engage, assess and intervene with children and families both preventively and with those experiencing challenges.  Students will also gain knowledge of the policies most salient to the lives of children and families and skills to effectively influence such policies. This concentration provides a solid framework for students interested in working in child protective services, schools and other public agencies or community-based non-profits.

Adulthood and Aging Concentration

The Adulthood and Aging concentration prepares students to use strength-based and evidence-based approaches to promote positive adult, older adult, and family functioning across diverse populations. Through coursework and field placements, students will acquire and enhance their skills to effectively engage, assess, and intervene with adults  and older adults. Students will gain knowledge of the unique psychosocial needs facing adults, older adults, and their families. Students will examine adulthood and the aging processes from multiple perspectives: biomedical, psychological, socioeconomic, spiritual and cultural while examining contemporary trends that are shaping aging policy, practice, and theory.  This concentration provides a solid framework for students interested in working in the areas of adult protective services, supportive services for family caregivers, Alzheimer’s and dementia care services, hospice services, the prison system and community corrections, promotion of healthy aging, long-term care, and health care collaborations.

Integrated Health Concentration

The Integrated Health concentration prepares students to use strength-based and evidence-based approaches to meeting the changing needs of people from diverse populations with physical, behavioral health, and substance use challenges. Through coursework and field placements, students will acquire and enhance their skills to effectively engage, assess, and intervene with individuals who face chronic diseases and co-occuring conditions of mental health challenges and/or substance use. Students will learn to utilize prevention and brief intervention models critical to integrated care and how to work effectively on an interdisciplinary team.  Students will learn how evidence-based practice, along with recovery-oriented and strengths-based care philosophies, can foster changes in practice settings and policies. This concentration provides a solid framework for students interested in working to deliver services in outpatient or primary care facilities, community-based behavioral health agencies, hospitals, and acute, chronic and long-term care settings.