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California State University, Long Beach
Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
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CSULB Gerontology Student Research 2013

Knowledge And Attitudes About Advance Health Care Directives Among Community Dwelling Hispanic Older Adults

Alma C. Madrid, M.S.

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the knowledge and attitudes about advance health care directives among community dwelling Hispanic older adults. The theme that emerged from 10 interviews was shared decision-making; with the older adult having the power to make autonomous decisions regarding their own end of life medical care and diffusing controls to external factors such as family, God, and doctors. Although respondents viewed the advance health care directive as a positive tool for end of life decision making, barriers to completion included (a) lack of knowledge, (b) lack of initiative on the part of the older adult and the physician to discuss end of life care, (c) health status, (d) religious beliefs, and (e) provoking sadness and worry within the family.
Education and resources should be directed to the responsible parties in end of life decision making, including the older Hispanic adult, family, and physician.

Alternative Transportation And Older Adults In Long Beach: Awareness, Planning, And Use

Christine Thayer,M.S.

Isolation increases when older adults stop driving or riding. Los Angeles County residents' greatest fear is the lack of transportation and ensuing social isolation. This is a preventable loss for older adults and for their communities. This study analyzed the awareness, planning, and use of alternative transportation by older adults in the City of Long Beach, California. It evaluated the relationship of destination and driving to the alternative transportation mode. The examination of existing survey data from 329 respondents over 55 years old found that despite their knowledge about transit alternatives, few older adults used or planned to use them. Participants, however, were interested in learning more about their alternative options. The survey findings agreed with existing literature on the need for increased use of alternative transportation by older adults to destinations supporting independence and healthy living. Recommendations include coordinated education and improved community transportation programs to meet the needs of a growing older adult population.

Exercise For Older Adults with Dementia

Christine Weber, M.S.

The purpose of this study was to identify, through meta-analytical techniques, evidence-based recommendations for the type, frequency, and duration of exercise to slow the progression of dementia. Inclusion criteria were that the research had to be published between January 2000 and January 2012 and include both pre- and post-Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. After conducting extensive computer-aided and manual searches, eight studies were chosen for analysis. Of those eight studies, one study in particular indicated the optimal type, frequency, and duration of exercise to slow the progression of dementia, which was walking four times per week for thirty minutes per session. Future research should include the impact of other forms of exercise on the progression of dementia and the role of physicians in the prescription of exercise to slow the progression of dementia.

 

Alma C. Madrid

Alma C. Madrid, M.S.

B.S. California State University Long Beach

 

 

 

Christine A. Thayer, M.S.

Christine A. Thayer, M.S.

B.S. California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks

 

 

 

Christine Weber, M.S.

Christine Weber, M.S.