In addition to the array of projects that the NCLR/CSULB Center conducts, the Center provides extensive national thought leadership and produces white papers, peer-reviewed research articles, and other materials that further our mission of promoting the health and well-being of the Latino population. The Center’s research has appeared in such publications as the Journal of Healthcare for the Poor and Underserved, Public Health Genomics, the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, and the Journal of Latino Studies.

Rios-Ellis, B., Organista, K., Becker, D., Espinoza, L., Bird, M., Galvez, G., & Rascón, M. (2013). Integrando Nuestra Visión: HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment through a Latino Lens of Community-Engaged Theory, Research, and Practice.
Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza (NCLR). [Download]

The HIV/AIDS White Paper titled ¿A Dónde Vamos? New Directions for Culturally Relevant Latino Community Involvement in HIV/AIDS Prevention and Services Research. Produced by the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), in 2011, provides an extensive analysis of the growing HIV/AIDS crisis among Latino subgroups in the U.S., incorporating existing literature, findings from numerous community-based organizations, and data collected from government agencies. Furthermore, it offers a contextual understanding of the Hispanic HIV/AIDS crisis that includes social, cultural, and structural-environmental factors. The report concludes with recommendations for the prevention and treatment of HIV and AIDS through contextualized community-based participatory research and service provision in partnership with the Hispanic community.

The HIV/AIDS White Paper titled Redefining HIV/AIDS for Latinos: A Promising New Paradigm for Addressing HIV/AIDS in the Hispanic Community combined findings from the NCLR HIV/AIDS Needs Assessment, published literature, and results from the Latinas and HIV/AIDS Summit.  In addition, discussion from the Town Hall on Latinos and HIV/AIDS, which was held at the NCLR National Conference in Los Angeles in July of 2006, was also incorporated. This report provided an opportunity to highlight new knowledge and outline ways to address HIV risk among Latinas and their families.  The paper was released October of 2006.

The Mental Health White Paper entitled Critical Disparities in Latino Mental Health was finalized for distribution in June of 2005.  This document covers an array of Latino mental health issues and has been helpful in informing policy and health care decisions affecting Latino mental health.

Rios-Ellis, B. (2006).  Redefining HIV/AIDS for Latinos.  A promising new paradigm for addressing HIV/AIDS in the Hispanic community.  Report published by the National Council of La Raza, available at www.nclr.org.

Rios-Ellis, B., Aguilar-Gaxiola, S., Cabassa, L., Caetano, R., Comas-Diaz, L., Flores, Y., Gonzalez, H., Lopez, S., Lopez-Zetina, J., Rodriguez Chandler, L., Leon, R., & Ugarte, C. (2005).  Critical disparities in Latino mental health.  Transforming research into action.  Report published by the National Council of La Raza, available at www.nclr.org.

Rios-Ellis, B., Garcia-Vega, M., Gatdula, N., & Galvez, G. (2013). Comienzo Sano: Familia Saludable Innovative Model to address Latino childhood obesity through community-based participatory research and bilingual family-focused curriculum. Obesity Interventions among US Populations: Evidence and Directions.” Johns Hopkins University Press

Frank, G. C., Beaudoin, J., Rascon, M., Garcia-Vega, M., & Rios-Ellis, B. (2013). “Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos. “ Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences, 105(1), 10-17.

Frank, G.C, Garcia, M. Ortega, E., & Rios-Ellis, B. (2012). “Reducing obesity risk by addressing breastfeeding with Latina moms using Motivational Interviewing Techniques.” Latinos and Hispanics in Dietetics and Nutrition Newsletter, Fall/Winter 2012.

Rios-Ellis, B., Rascon, M., Galvez, G., Inzunza-Franco, G., Bellamy, L., & Torres, A. (2012). “Creating a model of Latino peer education: Weaving cultural capital into the academic and institutional fabric of an urban university setting.” Journal Education in Urban Society, 45(6).

Rios-Ellis, B., Canjura, A.C., Korosteleva, O., Garcia, M., Bird, M. (2011). Rompe el Silencio: Break the Silence-Increasing sexual communication in Latina intergenerational family dyads.”  Hispanic Health Care International September 2011.

Rios-Ellis, B., Espinoza, L., Bird, M., Garcia, M., Hoyt-D’Anna, L. & Bellamy, L. (2010). “Increasing HIV-related knowledge, communication, and testing intentions among Latinos: Protege tu familia: Hazte la prueba.”  Journal of Healthcare for the Poor and Underserved. Supplement 21(3).

Kaphingst, K.A., Lachance, C.R., Gepp, A., Hoyt D’Anna, L., Rios-Ellis, B., (2009). “Educating underserved Latino communities about family health history using lay health advisors.” Public Health Genomics. (DOI:10.1159/000272456)

Rios-Ellis, B., Frates, J.,  Hoyt D’Anna, L.,  Dwyer, M., Ugarte, C.  Javier Lopez-Zetina (2008).  “Addressing the Need for Access to Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate HIV/AIDS Prevention for Latinos.”  Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 10: 445-460.

Rios-Ellis, B. & Gutierrez, J.A. (2008). “Latinas and deadly sex: The politics of HIV/AIDS Reporting.” Manuscript published in on-line journal Journal of Latino Studies.

  1. Rios-Ellis, B., Canjura, A.C., Garcia, M., Korosteleva, O., Nguyen-Rodriguez, S., Espinoza, L., Bird, M., Malotte, C.K. (2011). Rompe el Silencio (Break the Silence) – Increasing Sexual Communication in Latina Intergenerational Family Dyads. Hispanic Health Care International, 9(4):174-186.
  2. Allen, V.C., Lachance, C., Rios-Ellis, B., Kaphingst, K.A. (2011). Issues in the Assessment of “Race” Among Latinos: Implications for Research and Policy. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 33(4):411-424.
  3. Rios-Ellis, B., Espinoza, L., Bird, M., Garcia, M., D’Anna, L.H., Bellamy, L., Scolari, R. (2010). Increasing HIV-related knowledge, communication, and testing intentions among Latinos: Protege tu Familia: Hazte la Prueba. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 21(3):148-68.
  4. Lopez-Zetina, J., Sanchez-Huesca, R., Rios-Ellis, B., Friis, R., Torres, I., Rogala, B. (2010). Initiation to Methamphetamine Use in a Binational Sample of Women at the US-Mexico Border. Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 9:28-39.
  5. Rios-Ellis, B., Frates, J., D’Anna, L.H., Dwyer, M., Lopez-Zetina, J., Ugarte, C. (2008). Addressing the need for access to culturally and linguistically appropriate HIV/AIDS prevention for Latinos. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 10(5):445-60.
  6. Rios-Ellis, B., Gutierrez, J.A. (2007). Latinas and Deadly Sex: The Politics of HIV/AIDS Reporting. Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies, 2(3):120-137.
  7. Rios-Ellis, B. (2006).  Redefining HIV/AIDS for Latinos: A promising new paradigm for addressing HIV/AIDS in the Hispanic Community.  Report published by the National Council of La Raza, available at www.nclr.org
  8. Rios-Ellis, B., Frates, J. (2005). The Latino Healthcare Professionals Project: responding to the diverse needs of the 21st century. Journal of Health Administration Education, 22(2):171-87.
  9. Rios-Ellis, B., Aguilar-Gaxiola, S., Cabassa, L., Caetano, R., Comas-Diaz, L., Flores, Y., Gonzalez, H., Lopez, S., Lopez-Zetina, J., Rodriguez Chandler, L., Leon, R., & Ugarte, C. (2005).  Critical disparities in Latino mental health.  Transforming research into action.  Report published by the National Council of La Raza, available at www.nclr.org.
  10. Rios-Ellis, B., Frates, J. & Lopez-Zetina, J. (2005). Developing HIV prevention information for Latinos: Trabajando por la voz de la comunidad. Manuscript under review by Health Education and Behavior.
  11. Lopez-Zetina, J., Sanchez-Huesca, R., Friis, R., Rios-Ellis, B., & Garrido-Ortega, C. (2005).  Patterns of substance among treatment cases in the U.S./Mexico border.  San Diego and Tijuana, 1996-2002.  Manuscript accepted with revisions for publication in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.
  12. Rios-Ellis, B. & Frates, J. (2004).  The Latino Healthcare Professionals Project: Responding to the Diverse Needs of the 21st CenturyJournal of Health Administration Education, 22(2), 171-187.
  13. Rios-Ellis, B. (2004).  BE SAFE: A cultural competency model for Latinos.  Chief editor, first author of the Facts chapter, second author on the  Barriers to Care and Sensitivity of the Provider chapters.  National Minority AIDS Education and Training Center, Howard University Press, HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau, Grant No. 6 H4AH0066-0201.
  14. Rios-Ellis, B., Leon, R., Trujillo, E., Enguidanos, S., Dwyer, M., Ugarte, C., & Roman, R.. (2003).  De la palabra a la acción: La evolución de una encuesta nacional de Latinas y VIH/SIDA.  Ciencias de la Conducta, 18(1), pp. 78-104.
  15. Rios-Ellis, B., Dwyer, M., Roman, R., Leon, R., Enguidanos, S., Ugarte, C., Useche, B., Cruz-Gonzalez, Y. & Escabi, A. (2002).  The Latina HIV/AIDS Needs Assessment.  (Manuscript published in the proceedings of the World AIDS Conference in Barcelona).
  16. Rios-Ellis, B. & Carreon, R. (2002).  National Association of Community Health Centers, (2001).  Every Step Counts…Cada Paso Cuenta.  Principle writing consultant responsible for editing and writing Program Guide and Training Manual. Peer reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  17. Costa da Silva e Goldfarb, L., Rios-Ellis, B., Molinari, M. (2001). Latin America and the tobacco experience: A recent assessment of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico, Paraguay, and Peru.  Report written for the World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization based on the Initiative for a Tobacco Free World Conference, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, July 23 to 26.
  18. Rios-Ellis, B., Bellamy, L., & Shoji, J. (2000).  The influence of child-rearing practices and school social norms on the incidence of ijime in Japan.  Manuscript rejected for publication in The Journal of Research in Childhood Education.
  19. Rios-Ellis, B., Bellamy, L., & Shoji, J. (2000).  An examination of specific types of ijime and their prevalence within Japanese schoolsSchool Psychology International, 21(3): 227-241.
  20. Rios-Ellis, B. (1999).  Focus groups: A research tool for the community.  Manuscript requested for publication in the Midwest Hispanic AIDS Bulletin.
  21. De la Torre, A., Friis, R., Ellis, B., Hunter, H. & Garcia, L. (1999).  The health insurance status of older Latinas: A population at risk.  Border Health, 4(1), 23-31.
  22. Rios-Ellis, B. & Figueroa, M. (1998).  HIV/AIDS.  In Alan Henderson, Sally Champlin, & William Evashwick (Eds.),  Promoting teen health: Linking schools, health organizations, and community.  Newbury Park: Sage Publications.
  23. Rios-Ellis, B. (1997).  Ijime: Prevalence and Strategies for Prevention.  Manuscript published by the Japan Center for Family and Child Research in Tokyo, Japan.
  24. Rios-Ellis, B. (1997).  The potential impact of program planning and evaluation on organizational effectiveness.  Midwest Hispanic AIDS Bulletin, p. 1-2.
  25. Zambrana, R. & Ellis, B. (1995).  Contemporary research issues in Hispanic/Latino Women’s Health.  In Diane Adams (Ed.), Women of Color: A Cultural Diversity Health Perspective.  Newbury Park: Sage Publications.
  26. Hackman, R., Ellis, B., & Brown, R. L. (1993).  Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectra and changes in body composition during weight lossJournal of the American College of Nutrition, 13(3), pp. 243-250.
  27. Hackman, R. M., & Ellis, B. K. (March/April 1992c).  Increasing lean body mass during a weight management program.  Today’s Chiropractic, pp. 38-41.
  28. Hackman, R. M., & Ellis, B. K. (1991).  Increased lean body mass in conjunction with fat loss during a comprehensive weight management program.  International Clinical Nutrition Review, 11(4), pp. 185-189.

 

CSULB Gets $4.4 Million HSI Grant

February 1, 2012 (Inside CSULB)

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded CSULB a five-year, $4.4 million grant to help increase the number of Latino students earning degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Awarded through the department’s Hispanic Serving Institution’s (HSI) STEM and Articulation Programs, the grant will be used to develop the CSULB HSI STEM program Promotores de STEM with the purpose of improving the lack of highly qualified, first-generation educated Latino graduates prepared to pursue graduate degrees in the STEM fields.

Activities planned for the program include engaging Latino STEM students in summer programs; connecting Latino STEM students to a faculty mentor and other students in their major; annual advising; participation in learning communities; supplemental instruction and tutoring; providing transfer Latino students with an understanding of, and appreciation for, research experiences that help lead to careers in STEM fields; introducing STEM students to a research experience and the process of discovery; and creating a community of engaged learners.

University’s Latino Health Center Gets $1.75 Million Grant

December 29, 2011 (The Downey Patriot)

Project leaders expect to increase the pool of underrepresented, first-generation educated Latino students in the pipeline for readiness for graduate or professional level degrees and careers addressing health disparities by creating an annual corps of six (30 throughout the five years) master’s level, first-generation educated Latino students who can provide targeted tutoring and mentoring in chemistry, biology and other courses.

Increasing the number of Latino students graduating with pre-professional science and health science degrees prepared to enter master’s and terminal degree programs will facilitate careers in health disparities research, a critical national need.

The project also is expected to increase the awareness of and capacity to conduct health disparities research at CSULB and in the diverse local community through targeted events and conferences, including an annual Latino health equities conference, the first to be held in May 2012.

Professor works for HIV, STD Prevention

December 7, 2011 (Daily 49er – The Student Publication of California State University Long Beach)

Cal State Long Beach health science professor Britt Rios-Ellis has been federally commissioned to serve on a prestigious committee that advises government organizations on HIV and STD prevention and treatment.

The advisory committee, CHAC, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Health Resource Services and Administration Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment, is a work group that attempts to figure out how to get people with HIV to disclose their condition.

In addition to her four-year term with CHAC, Rios-Ellis has been elected to serve on the President’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS.
She will advise leaders of the government on policies for HIV and STD prevention and treatment.

13 Students from Cal State Long Beach Make Presentations at the 5th Annual National Conference on Health Disparities

December 5, 2011 (CSULB News and Events)

A group of 13 students from California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) attended and made poster presentations at the 5th annual National Conference on Health Disparities, held Nov. 30-Dec. 3 at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston. With this year’s theme “Reducing Health Disparities through Strengthening and Sustaining Healthy Communities,” the annual conference’s mission is to focus on policies and programs that address prevention, social determinants and personal responsibility to reduce health disparities.

The trip for all 13 CSULB students was made possible through scholarships from the Office of Minority Health and a variety of sources, said Britt Rios-Ellis, health science professor and director of the campus’ National Council of La Raza (NCLR)/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training. The scholarships covered travel costs, hotel and registration to attend the conference. Ten of the students were funded by the conference and the three additional students were funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD).

A Donde Vamos? New Directions for Culturally Relevant Latino Community Involvement in HIV/AIDS Research

December 2, 2011 (National Latino AIDS Action Network)

The National Latino AIDS Action Network (NLAAN), in partnership with the National Council of La Raza (NCLR)/California State University Long Beach Center for Latino Community Health, invites you to take part in the upcoming webinar – “¿A Dónde Vamos? – New Directions for Culturally Relevant Latino Community Involvement in HIV/AIDS Research.”

 

CSULB Health Science Professor Begins Work with National Advisor Committee on HIV, STD Prevention, and Treatment

November 18, 2011 (Everything Long Beach)

Britt Rios-Ellis, a health science professor at Cal State Long Beach (CSULB), has begun her work as a member of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment. The acronym for the committee is CHAC.

In addition, Rios-Ellis has been elected to the President’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) CHAC Disclosure Work Group.

Invited to serve on the committee by U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, Rios-Ellis will complete a four-year term with CHAC, which is responsible for advising Sebelius, the director of the CDC and the administrator and associate administrator for HIV/AIDS, HRSA, regarding the U.S. government’s objectives, strategies, policies and priorities for HIV and STD prevention and treatment efforts.

Center for Latino Community Health at Cal State Long Beach Receives $1.75 Million Grant

November 2, 2011 (Christian Media Cross – Presented by Libaw)

The project, called “Hispanic Health Opportunities Learning Alliance” (H2OLA), will provide health disparities research training and tutoring in science and public health disciplines to first-generation educated Latino students in their sophomore and junior years at CSULB with a focus on widening the pool of minority applicants with the academic potential to compete for admission to advanced degrees.

“Latino students, particularly those in the sciences, begin their studies wanting to be physicians but do not have the grade point averages they need to compete for the research positions and experiences that facilitate their admission to graduate school,” said Britt Rios-Ellis, co-principal investigator (co-PI) for the project and director of the NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health. ”This project will offer them mentorship and tutoring provided by high performing Latino peers with the goal of improved academic performance.

“I am really excited to be working with Dr. Eric Marinez, one of the few Latinos scientists on our campus,” added Rios-Ellis, a CSULB professor of health science. ”His insight and ability to serve as a Latino role model will help our students realize their vast potential.”

Center for Latino Community Health at Cal State Long Beach Receives $1.75 Million Grant

November 1, 2011 (Long Beach Post)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a five-year, $1.75 million grant to the National Council of La Raza/Cal State Long Beach Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training (NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health) for a project aimed at increasing the number of highly qualified Latino graduates prepared to engage in graduate degrees in health disparities research in both biomedical and health science-related disciplines.

 The grant was awarded under the purview of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health disparities (NIMHD) Science Education Initiative. The project called, “Hispanic Health Opportunities Learning Alliance” (H2OLA), will provide health disparities research training and tutoring in science and public health disciplines to first-generation educated Latino students in their sophomore and junior years at CSULB with a focus on widening the pool of minority applicants with the academic potential to compete for admission to advanced degrees.

CSULB Wins Grant to Aid Latinos

October 21, 2011 (Mariowire Latino Community)

Cal State Long Beach has been awarded a $4.4 million grant to help increase the number of Latino students earning degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

The five-year grant from the California Department of Education will be used to develop CSULB’s STEM program with the goal of increasing the number of qualified, first-generation Latino graduates in the STEM fields.

Plans for the program include engaging Latino STEM students in summer programs, connecting Latino STEM students to a faculty mentor, participation in learning communities, supplemental instruction and tutoring.

CSULB Wins Grant to Aid Latinos

October 20, 2011 (Contra Costa Times)

“Our hope is that this grant will help us encourage more Latino students to ultimately pursue careers in the natural sciences, technology, math and engineering-related disciplines,” CSULB President F. King Alexander said in a statement. “As a Hispanic-serving institution, Cal State Long Beach is in a great position to make a significant impact in this area, and this grant will further allow us to make continued strides in addressing the academic and professional success of our Latino students.”

CSULB ranks among the nation’s top 10 in awarding degrees to Latino students. In fall 2010, Latino students made up 29.2 percent of the CSULB student body, making them the largest ethnic group at the university, officials said.

Federal Grant Awarded to Latino Child Obesity Project

April 6, 2011 (Youth1.com)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has awarded a five-year, $3.75 million grant to the National Council of La Raza (NCLR)-Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training for a project designed to address Latino nutrition as it relates to the goal of reducing childhood obesity.

 Obesity is a health problem that disproportionately affects Hispanics/Latinos and contributes significantly to diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey administered by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, prevalence rates for overweight and obesity in children and adolescents have tripled in the past 30 years. Obesity prevalence among U.S. children ages 2-5 more than doubled between 1980 and 2008 from 5 percent to 10.4 percent, and these figures are even grimmer for many low-income and minority communities, with a particularly high prevalence among Latinos.

Center for Latino Community Health Earns HIV Prevention Grant

Fall 2010 (Beach Review)

The National Council of La Raza-Cal State Long Beach (NCLR-CSULB) Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Training continued to garner support for its healthcare initiatives when it received a two-year grant of nearly $500,000 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for a project aimed at reducing HIV infections among U.S. Latinas and their families.

“Hablando Claro” or “Straight Talk,” focuses on U.S. Latinas age 12 to 18 and their female family members by creating a cross-generational HIV/AIDS prevention intervention that will be implemented in Los Angeles County.

“Latinos continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV and AIDS,”said Britt Rios-Ellis, founding director of the NCLR-CSULB Center and professor of health science at CSULB, adding that many Latino teens haven’t received culturally and linguistically relevant HIV/AIDS prevention information.

$900K Grant to Help Middle School

December 16, 2009 (Long Beach Unified School District)

A $900,000 federal grant will allow California State University, Long Beach to work with Hamilton Middle School on improving student health and academic achievement. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently awarded the grant to the National Council of La Raza-Cal State Long Beach Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training.

The project, called “Youth Empowerment for Success! (YES!) Si Se Puede,” will provide academic mentoring, digital media skills, career development, college preparation and physical fitness activities to students from Hamilton.

Humana and National Council of La Raza Embark on Unique Study of Diabetes Management among Hispanic Seniors

In a joint effort to improve the health of Hispanic seniors with type 2 diabetes, Humana (NYSE: HUM) and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) have launched a study to test the “promotores de salud” – or, community health worker – approach to help this patient population better manage their disease to improve their health and well being.

NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training Celebrates Opening

June 15, 2005 (Inside CSULB)

A newly established Latino center at CSULB, designed to develop programs to better serve the health care needs of Latino communities, officially opened its doors on June 6, unveiling its new offices in the CSULB Foundation Building before a group of political, health and campus officials.

The Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training is a collaborative effort between CSULB and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) and was established with a $500,000 appropriation from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus with strong support from the Congressional Hispanic Task Force on Health.

The NCLR/CSULB center will work to develop health programs for underserved Latino communities, provide technical assistance to community-based organizations, and offer training for health professionals with a special emphasis on increasing the number of Latinos in health care leadership positions.

Center for Latino Community Health Unveiled

Fall 2005 (The Beach Review)

A newly established center at CSULB designed to develop programs to better serve the health care needs of Latino communities officially opened its doors in June. The Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation and Leadership Training is a collaborative effort between CSULB and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) and was established with a $500,000 appropriation from the Congressional Hispanic Caucus with strong support from the Congressional Hispanic Task Force on Health.